From The Print Section :: Page 151

  • Parties bond neighborhoods

    Kids and grown-ups alike appeared to enjoy themselves at one of last year’s 19 neighborhood block parties, sponsored by the Human Relations Commission. This year’s block parties take place the week-end of Aug. 19–21, with most on Sunday, Aug. 21, 5–8 p.m. Check the accompanying article for the list of the neighborhoods having parties, and if you wish to host one in your neighborhood, contact Joan Chappelle at 767-7056. (Submitted photo by Susan Gartner)

    Organizers of the annual neighborhood block parties want participants to have a good time. But beyond that, they aim to strengthen the ties between those who live close to each other in Yellow Springs.

  • First small step for senior apartments

    The most recent senior housing complex proposed for the Barr property downtown got its first nod from Village Planning Commission during a packed public hearing on Monday, Aug. 8.

  • Farming food, reaping knowledge

    Antioch Gardens Info

    Preparing the ground for incoming students took on new meaning last week at Antioch College, as the revived college launched the Antioch College Farm, its first major sustainability project.

  • P.O. changes, service same

    Changes have begun at the Yellow Springs Post Office as part of a nationwide effort by the U.S. Postal Service to cut costs by closing some post offices and consolidating functions among others.

  • e-HDS prepares local move

    “It’s exciting, isn’t it? We’re going to stay in Yellow Springs,” e-Health Data Solutions President John Sheridan said last week. “I’m happy everything worked out.”

  • Teachers agree to pay freeze

    The Yellow Springs school board unanimously approved a new contract with the Yellow Springs Education Association at its meeting Monday, Aug. 1.

  • Jacoby headwaters land preserved

    Dairy farmer Jim Semler and Tecumseh Land Trust associate director Michele Burns celebrated the closing of an easement on the 171-acre Semler farm on Snypp Road, one mile west of Yellow Springs. The farm, which contains the headwaters of the Jacoby Creek, is the first property in the Jacoby Greenbelt preserved with Village funds.

    The Semler farm on Snypp Road, one mile west of Yellow Springs, is one of only four remaining dairy farms in Greene County and contains the spring-fed headwaters of the Jacoby Creek, a source of the Village’s drinking water

  • New, lush tunes on village streets

    Street musician Ben Hemmendinger can often be found in front of Tom’s Market playing his accordion. He returned to the village about six months ago, having lived here until he was 7. Scroll to the bottom of the post to hear Ben play an Irish tune. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Ben Hemmendinger says that his mom insists that when he bought his first accordion at age 8 (with a $20 gift from his grandmother), he said someday he’d play the instrument in the street.

  • Center seeks input on new vision

    Yellow Springs Senior Center leaders seek feedback from the community following a presentation of a newly designed vision for the center on Thursday, Aug.11 at 7 p.m. in the center’s great room. Shown above is Director David Scott. (From the Yellow Springs News Archives)

    While riding on the bike path one weekend, out-of-town architect Doug Gallow and his gerontologist wife, Ellen, who specialize in designing senior centers, just happened to pass the Yellow Springs Senior Center and stop in.

  • T-ball love, Yellow Springs style

    Eve Diamond handed off a ball to Mia Campbell to toss back during the Perry League t-ball’s final game of the season last Friday, Aug. 5, at Gaunt Park. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Someone put a hundred dollar bill in our donation jar Friday night. A hundred dollars! It stuns and gratifies us.