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From The Print Section :: Page 18

  • ‘Shout’ in the streets

    Local yoga teacher and choreographer Katy Gaines led the group of local seniors in the dance, which they learned at previous rehearsals. Last year seniors boogied to “I Heard it Through the Grapevine.” (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Last week the Yellow Springs Senior Center organized a flash mob dance to the Isley Brothers 1959 hit “Shout” to commemorate National Senior Health and Fitness Day.

  • June 4, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

    Sophomore track athlete Julie Roberts ran the 300-meter hurdles to a seventh-place finish in the regional finals last weekend. She ran the race in in 48.75 seconds. (Submitted photo by Coach Peter Dierauer)

    June 4, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

  • Virginia (Ginny) Brintlinger Willey

    Virginia (Ginny) Brintlinger Willey

    Virginia (Ginny) Brintlinger Willey passed away Thursday, May 28, at the Hospice House of Williamsburg, following a six-month struggle with leukemia.

  • Village Council— No easy options for sidewalks


    There were no easy options presented by Assistant Village Manager John Yung in his report on local sidewalks to Village Council at its May 18 meeting.

  • YSHS music room is made harmonious

    YSHS Band and orchestra director Brian Mayer used community resources to create a music library, searchable online, in one of the rooms in the “flying saucer” at the high school. It’s taken him two years, but thousands of band and orchestra scores and pieces can now be found on a database at Mayer’s staff page from the high school website. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    For the past two years of his tenure as head of the McKinney/YSHS music department, Brian Mayer has sorted and catalogued all the school’s music, and built a searchable music library, which can be shared with anyone in the community.

  • Luisa Owens’ poems bear witness, honor dead

    Luisa Owen will read her original poems in German on Friday, June 5, at the Epic Book Shop. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Luisa Owens’ poems describe the terror and inhumanity of daily life in the concentration camp in Yugoslavia, where Owen lived with her family shortly before the end of World War II, from the ages of 9 to 13.

  • New fund establishes money for young artists

    Nadia Mulhall received the first award this year from the Lisa Goldberg YS Arts Scholarship, established by ceramic artist and art supporter Lisa Goldberg to help young people or college-bound seniors further their education in the arts. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Scholarships support Yellow Springs students with many different abilities and interests, but to local resident Lisa Goldberg, scholarships in the visual arts are not as numerous as those in other fields.

  • YSHS athletes advance to regionals

    YSHS track and field athlete Ed Johnson sprinted the last leg of the 4x400-meter relay at last week’s district meet. Johnson helped his team clinch third place and qualify for regionals with a time of 45.78 seconds. Olivia Brintlinger-Conn cleared a hurdle on her way to a regional qualification last week. At the high school district track and field meet, Brintlinger-Conn finished fourth in the 300-meter hurdles in 49.53 seconds to advance to regionals. (Left photo by Tim Sherwood; right photo by Jesi Worsham)

    Yellow Springs High School track and field teams — both boys and girls — are sending more athletes on to regionals than at any time in the last 25 years.

  • David William Prince

    David William Prince

    David William Prince, 73, of Athens, died on Sunday, May 17, at St. Ann’s Mt. Carmel Hospital in Westerville, Ohio, from complications of neck spine surgery.

  • Antioch College is a real food leader

    Antioch College Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre joined students Sara Brooks and Rhianna Guerin on the Antioch Farm last week to talk about a growing group of 35 colleges and universities who have committed to consume at least 20 percent real food (local, humane, ecologically sound and fair trade) by 2020. Though new to the Real Food Challenge, the college is already leading the way with a pledge of 60 percent real food by 2020. (Photo by Laruren Heaton)

    According to Antioch Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre, 56 percent of Antioch’s food is considered “real”, meaning sourced from locally owned, ecologically sound, humane farms with fair employment practices.