From The Print Section :: Page 18

  • ‘Superhuman Happiness’ at YSKP

    Gods and goddesses of Roman myth will do battle in the Antioch Amphitheater during this summer’s Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse production, “Superhuman Happiness.” Some of the 49 youth in the show are, from left, Nia Dyer (Helen), Sammie Woolley (Clara), Zoe Williams (Arachne), Chekinah Williams (Ceres), Reese Elam (Juno), Jaylen Mitchell (Jove). “Superhuman Happiness” runs July 10–13 and July 17–20. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Everything changes, nothing perishes.

    So writes Roman poet Ovid in his magnum opus “Metamorphoses,” from which the new Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse original musical “Superhuman Happiness” is adapted.

  • Village vampire taps a wicked vein

    Yellow Springs native Michael Malarkey plays the rebel vampire Enzo in the CW network’s popular show “Vampire Diaries.” Season six, Malarkey’s first as a full cast member, premieres on Oct. 2. (Submitted photo © 2014 Bob Mahoney, WBEI. All rights reserved.)

    He is a blood-sucking renegade vampire resurrected into a revenge-mad ghost villian after his heart is ripped out.

    While this character of Enzo on the CW television network’s “Vampire Diaries” may be macabre, it’s one that actor Michael Malarkey has been dying to play.

  • Yellow Springs Summer Strings winds down— Come one, come all to Grand Finale

    The Yellow Springs Summer Strings and Band Program will celebrate its 50th year as a summer music program for local children with a cello choir for alumni this Saturday, July 5, at 5 p.m., followed by a full orchestra performance. Shown above is an early concert with Summer Strings’ founder, Shirley Mullins, who continues to direct the program. (submitted photo)

    Two weeks ago, the Yellow Springs Summer Strings and Band Program had its Grande Finale concert outside at Mills Lawn. The youth played their violas and clarinets to the tune of “Cherokee Chief,” “Slavic Air,” and an all-camp sing to “The Power of One.”

  • Antioch College gets OK on solar array

    THUMB_HigherEd

    Antioch College cleared a major hurdle this week in its plan to build a 1-megawatt solar array on campus.

  • Yellow Springs schools aim to opt out of tests

    THUMB_Schools

    The Ohio legislature recently approved an education bill that gives Yellow Springs schools a chance to apply for a waiver from any and all state and federally mandated standardized tests.

  • Water plant decision moves ahead

    THUMB_Print

    A decision on how to deal with the ailing Village water plant needs to take place soon, Village Council members were told at their June 16 meeting. “Joe believes the project can’t wait,” Council President Karen Wintrow said to Council, referring to Village Water and Wastewater Plant Superintendent Joe Bates. In recent weeks, one of […]

  • John Owen Hevelin

    Obituary

    John Owen Hevelin, born May 10, 1946, died in Santa Cruz, Calif. on May 11. He had deep attachments to Yellow Springs and to Antioch College, where he received his Bachelor of Arts in English, education and history in 1968. A life-long pacifist, John was a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War and was assigned […]

  • Local roots show at Summer Music Bash

    THUMB_Music

    Blues riffs, DJ scratches, hip-hop beats and R&B harmonies will mingle in the hot July air in downtown Yellow Springs at an upcoming celebration of local music.

  • Sea Dogs are off and swimming

    THUMB_Sports

    The Yellow Springs Aquatic Club Sea Dogs summer swim team are off and swimming. They won one meet against Forest Ridge, after competing in three swim meets so far this summer. Results are as follows, 6 and under 25 free: first place, Zan Holtgrave; second place, Javin Obringer; third place, Brady Clark; 6 and under […]

  • Community Solutions evolves— New director for nonprofit

    Susan Jennings of Marion, Mass. is the new executive director of the Arthur Morgan Institute, a non-profit organization on East Whiteman Street that promotes solutions to global climate change. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Global warming. Climate change. Peak Oil.

    News about environmental concerns is frequently grim and overwhelming. What can a single person do?