From The Print Section :: Page 196

  • The chips are down

    Mills Lawn School parents, kids, teachers and staff, including Principal Matt Housh, grabbed shovels last Saturday to spread a new layer of mulch on the playground, providing a soft landing for any students who might take a tumble. Shown above are, from left, parent Chris Wyatt with, on the hill from left, Tavien Clay with a shovel; Reese Spurgeon, sliding down; Bob and Morris Wyatt; and Max Banaszak-Moore. (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the Yellow Springs News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • Film tracks exotic pet industry

    Exotic pet owner Terry Brumfield sat with his pet lions at home in Piketon, Ohio, in a scene captured by Springboro filmmaker Mike Webber for his award-winning documentary The Elephant in the Living Room. The filmmaker will introduce the film at the first showing of a run of sneak previews from Friday, Oct. 8–Thursday, Oct. 14, at the Little Art Theatre. (submitted photo)

    Throughout the 1980s on the east side of Hilltop Road at Fairground Road there stood a modest, old house with a conspicuously large metal cage in the back yard. On nice days, passersby who happened to focus beyond the fencing would likely have seen what appeared to be a lion. Was it a pet? Did it live there permanently? Could it escape?

  • Council eyes sidewalk policy

    At their Oct. 4 meeting, Village Council members will continue a discussion on long-range Village sidewalk policy, and consider whether current policy, which assesses property owners for sidewalk repair, should be revised. “Something needs to happen,” Council member Karen Wintrow said last week, stating that Council should “provide more clarity and direction for citizens.”

  • Meister is a boon for Boonshoft

    Yellow Springs resident Mark Meister, head of the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery in Dayton, recently oversaw an expansion of the museum’s zoo exhibit. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s as if Mark Meister’s whole career led up to his current post. He served as founding director of a children’s museum in Minneapolis, headed the nation’s largest archeology organization and directed science and art museums around the country, always with a focus on education.

  • New band Kuan defies labels

    At a band practice in Dayton, from left, Kuan’s drummer Brett Nagafuchi, guitarist Charles Heck, guitarist Paul Larkowski and bass player Bryan Wright played tracks from their latest album, “Colors.” (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Kuan’s brand of experimental instrumental rock music breaks all the rules. More art than entertainment, the local band’s addition to the already-diverse Yellow Springs music scene is rock that’s both highly composed and free jazz-inspired. Recently returned from a 32-day, 30-city nationwide tour and with a new EP album,“Colors”…

  • Antioch School kids feel the beat

    Kids love drums. Performer and educator Eric “The Fish” Paton thinks he knows why. “There’s this sense of personal expression that’s possible,” Paton said in a recent interview, comparing introducing drums to a group of children with introducing oboes, a process that would take considerably longer. “Everyone can find their voice quickly.”

  • Bulldog Sports Round-up

    The YSHS boys soccer team ended a season-long winning drought on Thursday, Sept. 23, defeating the Xenia Christian Ambassadors 4–1 at home at the school’s homecoming game. Defender Elliot Cromer put the local side up 15 minutes into the match when he scored on an 18-yard looping header from the top of the penalty box.

  • Gym open for basketball

    The Yellow Springs High School boys basketball program will host open gym sessions beginning at 7 p.m. through the fall. The Tuesday session will be held at the Bryan Community Center, and on Wednesdays it will be at the YSHS gym.

  • Hannah Goldberg

    Hannah Goldberg

    Hannah Goldberg died on Sept. 24, at Friends Care Community with her beloved daughter, Lisa, and close friends by her side. She was 77. Hannah was born on Jan. 28, 1933, the daughter of Charles and Minnie Friedman. Her parents, both immigrants, met while taking classes in English at night school.

  • Why they’re dahlias, dahlink, dahlias

    A laciniated nenekazi dahlia blossomed in Dinah Anderson's garden on Orton Road. (photos by Lauren Heaton)

    Several Yellow Springers devoted themselves to their dahlia patches this year and produced some breathtaking flowers. Even if these dahlias didn’t win ribbons, they certainly won hearts.