From The Print Section :: Page 89

  • New villager Brian Housh—Bringing talents from Thailand

    Brian Housh, who moved to the village this year after 12 years in Thailand, works as the gallery marketing director for the Yellow Springs Arts Council. He’s shown here at the group’s new space on Corry Street. (Photo by Sehvilla Mann)

    When Brian Housh had lived in Yellow Springs for one month, he surprised a friend by handing him a business card. “You’ve only lived here a month — how can you already have a card?” the friend asked.

  • Documentary ‘The Invisible War’— Sexual violence in military endemic

    In Iraq or Afghanistan today, an American female soldier has a greater chance of being raped than killed by enemy fire. According to estimates by the Department of Defense, in 2010 there were 19,000 violent sexual assaults against women in the military.

  • Painter returns for son’s schooling

    Tia Acheson, who grew up in Yellow Springs and then moved to Washington state with her family, has returned to the village with her son, Luca. An artist, she works as a professional painter, and specializes in creating murals. (photo by Sarah Siff)

    Aside from the magnetic pull that Yellow Springs seems to exert over artists, painter Tia Acheson felt another element drawing her toward her childhood home. The village native, 41, wanted her son, Luca, 5, to attend the Antioch School where she herself had learned to create.

  • Laying out his wears (pun intended)

    No related posts.

  • Village Council—Revenues drop slightly in ’12

    Revenues in the Village general fund budget have dropped 11 percent overall compared to a year ago this time, according to Village Finance Director Sharon Potter at Council’s Aug. 6 meeting.

  • A ‘group hug’ from YS foundation

    What do the doors at the library, the mural under the Little Art Theatre marquee, the roof of the Community Children’s Center, the soccer fields at the high school, the dishwasher at the Senior Center, the wood kiln at John Bryan Community Pottery and the handicapped access ramp at Glen Helen have in common?

  • United Way slashes funds to YSCC

    In June the YSCC board learned that its annual funding through United Way of Greater Dayton had been cut from about $16,000 down to $700 for the 2012–13 and 2013–14 fiscal years.

  • The Little Library that could

    Love of reading can now be shared at a neighborhood level using the new tiny library in Moya Shea’s yard at 310 South High Street. The little library operates more like a swap: take a book, leave a book. If the cranberry crate seems too small to serve the whole neighborhood, visit the Little Free Libraries website and learn how to start a library in your front yard. (submitted photo by Susan Gartner)

    Many positive things can be said about libraries, including that they can’t be too small and a town can’t have too many.

  • Council votes on streetscape Aug. 20

    At its Aug. 6 meeting, fewer people showed up for Village Council’s discussion on the proposed streetscape changes than at Council’s last meeting, and fewer people spoke against the changes.

  • Council puts drilling ban on hold for now

    At the Aug. 6 Village Council meeting, a group of citizens urged Council to be the first municipality in the state to ban oil and gas drilling in town in an effort to protect local water.

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