Aug
31
2015
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Sunday
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Partly Cloudy
Monday
High 86° / Low 65°

Government Section :: Page 59

  • Business park’s widened road elicits concern

    The Village of Yellow Springs is considering a plan to create a new entrance off Dayton-Yellow Springs Road directly into the Center for Business and Education (CBE), the new business park created by Community Resources on the west edge of the village. Though the authority to approve the intersection rests with the Greene County Engineer, Village Council will discuss the proposal when the park, which was annexed into the village in 2005, comes up for approval as a subdivision later this year.

  • Rate hike gets initial approval

    At its Jan. 19 meeting, Village Council gave initial approval to a water rate increase that will take place over five years, beginning in April 2010, by unanimously passing the first reading of a new ordinance. Council will vote on the final reading for the rate hike at its Feb. 1 meeting.

  • Council, YSCR future partners?

    What is the best strategy for economic development in Yellow Springs? What role, if any, should the nonprofit group Community Resources play in advising the Village on development? What stands in the way of Community Resources and Village Council working together?

  • Village Council — New economic sustainability group considered

    At their Jan. 4 meeting, Village Council members continued an extended discussion on how the Village should best address economic development by considering a proposal for an economic sustainability commission from Council President Judith Hempfling, and discussed concerns about a new ordinance establishing procedures to notify citizens about public meetings.

  • Village Council— New meeting rules approved

    At their Dec. 21 meeting, members of Village Council unanimously gave preliminary approval to a new ordinance on procedures for calling public meetings.

    “I feel strongly that we want to be as transparent as possible,” said Council President Judith Hempfling. “With this in place, I’m comfortable that we’ve done everything that we can do.”

  • Council considers rate hike

    At the Dec. 7 Village Council meeting, Village Manager Mark Cundiff recommended that the Village increase water rates next year in order to address water department capital needs. The last water rate increase was in 2001, and expenses have gone up since then, while some major utility users have been lost, according to Cundiff. Consequently, the water utility fund is operating at a deficit.

  • Village to lease Stutzman property

    In an interview this week, Cundiff said that, while Stutzman remained current with rent payments, he had not responded to a request from Council many months ago for a plan regarding how he planned to keep current with rent over the winter months. Stutzman’s lease is being terminated due to his not responding to Council’s request for a plan, Cundiff said.

  • Village seeks energy grant

    In the interest of supporting energy conservation measures, Village Council members agreed at a special meeting on Friday, Dec. 11, to sign the Village on as a municipal sponsor of a grant proposal to develop an affordable home retrofit process for energy efficiency. The Village will support Community Solutions and an area business in the application for federal stimulus grant money, which if awarded, will need further action by Council to participate in the program.

  • Visioning to turn ideas into goals

    The second stage of the community visioning process kicks off this Saturday morning, Dec. 12, at 10 a.m. in the Yellow Springs High School gym, and it is not a meeting to miss, according to organizers. The 855 ideas generated by community members in the first round of public workshops stand sorted into 14 topic categories. Now, villagers and Miami Township residents are invited to help discern goals from these raw ideas that everyone can agree to move forward with.

  • Plug pulled on power plant

    The Village made what some would call a wise and prescient decision last year when it declined to sign on to the coal-fired power plant American Municipal Power, Inc. planned to build along the Ohio River. AMP announced last week on Nov. 25 that it was terminating the AMPGS project due to a spike in construction cost estimates that rendered the project unaffordable for its customers.