Antioch College Section :: Page 10

  • Antioch organizes Occupy teach-in

    Antioch College literature professor Geneva Gano gave a history of teach-ins at Antioch at its latest one on the Occupy Movement. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Antioch College faculty and students organized a teach-in on the Occupy Movement last week. See more photos from the event.

  • New college dines responsibly

    Antioch College Chef Isaac DeLamatre made plans for the opening of the college’s new kitchen and dining room, which opened on Nov. 9 in the basement of Birch Hall. Dean of Community Life Louise Smith led the design of a cooperative, locally-sourced plan to feed the campus. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Antioch college’s innovative approach to food was born partly of the need to recognize the ecological demands of food service and also to honor the experience of eating in community.

  • Gegner legacy strong after 50 years

    Paul Graham with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission incident report. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Fifty years ago this month, African-American villager Paul Graham was refused a haircut at Louis Gegner’s barbershop on Xenia Avenue, sparking a historic legal case at the height of the U.S. civil rights movement. Today, villagers look back on the Gegner incident.

  • Hope, grit at revived Antioch

    Several hundred villagers and Antioch College community members came together for a potluck dinner last Friday evening at the college’s art building. Shown above are, bottom left, major gift officer Eric Miller, with alumni board member Karen Mulhauser of Washington, D.C. standing behind. At far right, Vice President of Academic Affairs Hassan Rahmanian talks with board of trustees member Fran Horowitz of New York City; standing behind is President Mark Roosevelt. After the potluck, a large group moved to Herndon Gallery, where President Roosevelt gave an update on the college’s progress. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The past few months have been hopeful ones for the Antioch College community, according to President Mark Roosevelt in an update Friday, Oct. 21, to Yellow Springers and college faculty, staff, students, alumni and trustees.

  • Optimism at Antioch College, and hard work ahead

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    On Friday evening, Antioch College President Mark Roosevelt gave an update on the college’s progress to an overflow crowd of college and Yellow Springs community members.

  • Class of 2015 to arrive at Antioch

    Zeb Reichert and Megan Miller, shown here at McGregor Hall, are Yellow Springs community members who are among the group of 35 Antioch College students arriving on campus this Saturday, Sept. 24. On Sunday the students begin a two-day community-building workshop at the Outdoor Education Center in Glen Helen, along with college faculty and some staff. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Antioch’s first class will arrive on campus this Saturday, Sept. 24. Their arrival, from across the country as well as near Yellow Springs, is the culmination of two years of planning and preparation by the college

  • New students to arrive at Antioch College

    Zeb Reichert and Megan Miller are two Yellow Springs area young people who are part of Antioch College's first class of students. The students arrive at Antioch on Saturday, Sept. 24, to begin their school year.

    The 35 members of the first class of the revived Antioch College will arrive on campus this Saturday,
    Sept. 24. After a 10-day orientation, classes begin on Tuesday, Oct. 4.

  • ‘Whoo Cooks For You’ for the birds

    Some of the region’s top chefs will prepare a six-course meal with local foods for this weekend’s Whoo Cooks for You? fundraiser dinner for the Glen Helen Raptor Center. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    You might call it avian welfare, Social Security for the birds, funding the feathered, even banking for the beaked. Like many people, the disabled birds at the Glen Helen Raptor Center are out of a job and need support.

  • Farming food, reaping knowledge

    Antioch Gardens Info

    Preparing the ground for incoming students took on new meaning last week at Antioch College, as the revived college launched the Antioch College Farm, its first major sustainability project.

  • A farm takes root at Antioch College

    Antioch College recently announced that its begun the Antioch College Farm, its first major sustainability project, to be located on the former "golf course." Shown above is the committee of faculty and staff who are meeting to explore ways to integrate the farm into campus life. Shown above are, from left first row, chemistry professor David Kammler; local farmer Kat Christen, who will design the farm's first phase; Dean of Community Life Louise Smith; and Glen Helen Project Managers Ann Simonson and Brooke Bryan. In back are Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis, who will coordinate campus sustainability efforts, and philosophy professor Lewis Trelawny-Cassity. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Antioch College has announced that it has begun work on the Antioch College farm, its first major sustainability project, which organizers hope to incorporate into many aspects of campus life and curriculum. Local organic farmer Kat Christen has been hired to develop the farm’s first phase.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground