African Americans In YS Section :: Page 2

  • 2010 Census redux— Stats confirm diversity drop

    Yellow Springs has become a much less racially-diverse community with 40 percent fewer people of color than in 1970, according to the latest 2010 U.S. Census data released.

  • Let freedom ring

    The reverend himself joins the citizens of Yellow Springs during the MLK Day march (photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    The streets of Yellow Springs echoed with the sounds of the civil rights movement Monday morning. Admirers of Martin Luther King Jr. chanted “We Shall Overcome” as they marched through the streets; a jovial tribute to one of the most iconic and important figures in American history. Upon the crowd’s arrival at the Central Chapel […]

  • MLK Jr. day in Yellow Springs

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers the 1965 commencement address at Antioch College. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana/Antioch College Archives)

    In observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday this Monday, Jan. 17, village offices, schools and the News will be closed.

  • Bluesfest a cultural treasure

    DJ Smooth of the Ark Band performs at the 2006 Blues and Jazz Festival, begin held this year from Friday, Sept. 10 to Saturday, Sept. 11 at the Antioch Amphitheater. (Photo by Robert Hasek)

    In its 13th year, AACW’s Blues and Jazz Festival, offers a mix of returning artists and new acts sure to entertain, and educate, audiences.

  • Juneteenth a Scrumptious Affair

    Juneteenth pies lined up for the judges during the Juneteenth celebration

    Juneteenth celebrations included a pie contest and Motown dancing last Friday night at the Bryan Center.

  • Assessing the value of diversity

    For Jewell Graham, the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s were exhilarating times to live in the village. Having come to Yellow Springs as a young African-American woman with her new husband, Paul, who after graduating from Antioch had been offered a job at Vernay Laboratories, Graham was impressed with the quality of relationships between blacks and whites. Many businesses were integrated in a way unusual for the time, and a passion for the civil rights movement further brought people together. There was considerable socializing between blacks and whites in her world, as well as a sense of shared purpose.

  • Do housing costs affect diversity?

    If local diversity can be measured by the number of African Americans who live within the geographical boundaries of Yellow Springs, the village has experienced three decades of decreasing diversity, and is likely wrapping up a fourth. Since 1970, the village has lost about 500 African-American residents, mirroring a larger regional trend.

  • Diversity decline linked to fewer jobs

    If Yellow Springs has lost a significant number of jobs in the past 15 years, it follows that villagers have lost employment opportunities, which has a visible effect on an already minority African-American population. There are fewer African Americans employed in the village now than there were 30 years ago, and though there have never been a lot of African Americans who own and operate businesses in town, the current number appears to be lower than ever.

  • Village youth say race is still an issue

    Yellow Springs can be a supportive town for black youth to grow up in, according to a group of 10 current Yellow Springs High School students and recent graduates in recent interviews. But the village is not immune to the issues that tend to divide the community by color and burden some African-American families disproportionately. Instances of discrimination are very subtle, and can be unintentional, but they do occur here, the youth said, and they pose obstacles both of perception and in actual practice that young people of color are challenged to overcome.

  • Achievement gap complex, but true

    When Joyce McCurdy accepted a teaching position in the Yellow Springs School District, there was a black chief of police, a black member of Council, and a black member of school board. The principal of the high school was black, and three of McCurdy’s colleagues were also black — and actively involved in the social issues of the day. The year was 1965.