Educational & Cultural Section :: Page 5

  • Parents start local Montessori

    Chaos reigned on a recent Wednesday in the Bryan Center gym, where a toddler play group meets each week. Balls were flying and kids caromed off of each other as mothers stood by watchfully. Then a box of curious looking toys were spread out, and one by one, the children came to sit on their mats and check out the shapes, colors and moving parts of the materials before them. The children were rapt, and according to Nacim Sajabi, they were learning in the Montessori model.

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because you can be yourself, no matter where you are in the village.

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

  • Top library hopes for support

    Call him crazy, but Greene County Public Library Director Karl Colón believes that the library ought to serve the taxpayers who support it. When the people said in a 2005 survey that they wanted more youth programs, better communication and a bigger collection, the Yellow Springs library started console game madness for teens, gussied up its newsletter and Web site and started ordering more books.

  • Patterson honor: celebrating others

    You could call Faith Patterson a woman with a passion for bringing people together. As a leader of the African-American Cultural Works, or ACCW, she’s been pursuing that passion for more than a decade, spearheading such community-building events as Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, the recent Roots brunch, and the upcoming annual AACW Blues/Jazz Fest.

  • A lifetime of making a difference

    On an ordinary street in town, there is an ordinary brick ranch with two ordinary maple trees planted in the front yard. But inside this ordinary house is a woman with an unordinary history. It’s a personal history that reflects advances in civil rights and decolonization. It’s the history of one woman with a pioneering spirit, keen leadership skills and a love of learning.

  • Iran turmoil hits home for some

    Villagers with family and friends in Iran have been watching the recent turmoil in that country closely. Among them are, shown above from left, new village resident Farideh Tahririha, holding her great-nephew Sameer Sajabi; Nacim Sajabi, who was raised in Yellow Springs, with her son, Mateen; and Mahshad Tahririha and her aunt, Farzaneh Mader, Nacim’s mother.

    When Nacim Sajabi had her first child several years ago, she surprised herself by speaking to her baby in Farsi, the language of Iran, her mother’s homeland. While Sajabi’s mother, Farzaneh Mader, and her aunts and grandmother had spoken Farsi to Sajabi as she grew up in Yellow Springs, she most often responded in English. But the birth of her firstborn seemed to spark inside her some deep connection with the language she didn’t even know she had.

  • Gardens yield more than green

    Some members of the loosely-networked community gardening group are shown in the FCC garden. Pictured from left to right are: standing, back row: Meranda Pelzl, Corinne Pelzl, Daniel L. Pelzl, Rob Content and Doug ‘Thor’ Bailey. Middle row, seated: Faith Morgan, Eric Johnson, Jenny Haack, Max Banaszak-Moore, Bob Moore. Front row: McKenna Banaszak-Moore and Christine O. Roberts, Sally Palmer and Paul Webb.

    Some say starting a garden is an act of faith, a passive act done best when the moon is right. Others, like a new local community gardening group, plan for a good crop by building beds of e-mail list serves and germinating ideas at community potlucks.

    This loosely networked bunch of area gardening enthusiasts and hopeful amateurs has scattered seeds of intention across the village and Miami Township that just might sprout up in the form of shared gardens, seed swaps and educational activities near you.

  • Original music, home grown musicians in FMC benefit

    The Friends Music Camp chorus is shown here performing at a concert during the summer of 2007, led by choral director Brendan Cooney. Friends Music Camp staff will perform in concert Tuesday, Dec. 30, 7 p.m. at the Friends Care Extended Living Facility dining room in an event to raise funds for the camp’s scholarship fund.

    A benefit concert to raise money for Friends Music Camp scholarships will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 30, at the Friends Care Extended Living Center dining room, 150 East Herman Street in Yellow Springs.

  • School serves up wisdom, skills

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool begins its mission of passing along life skills and wisdom with a ‘folkshop,’ Oct. 17–18, at the Glen Helen Outdoor Education Center. Shown left to right are organizers and contributors, front row, Eric Wolf, Kay Reimers; back row, Carolion, Suzanne Rudolf, Joe Cook.

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool, which has been quietly simmering on a back burner, is ready to be served. “It’s come from a lot of people,” said artist Carolion, one of the initial organizers of the school. “It’s been cooking and bubbling for months.”

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