Jun
29
2015
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Monday
High 70° / Low 59°
Thunderstorm
Tuesday
High 77° / Low 60°

Educational & Cultural Section :: Page 5

  • Church harbors a market in winter

    While church basements tend to be the place for after-service coffee hours and socials, the basement of the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church will soon veer off the traditional path and host vegetables. Beginning this Saturday, Jan. 9, from 9 a.m. to noon, the church will sponsor its first winter farmers market.

  • Predictions abound for YS in 2010

    A sushi bar. A roller-skating rink, a wind farm and a better set of school leaders than this town has yet to imagine. Short Street will become a park. Vernay will be fenced for dog walkers. No matter what reveals itself in 2010, it will be a better year than last, according to many villagers […]

  • Benning served village in work, life

    Village Council Clerk Deborah Benning, right, with her mother, the late Etta Belle Harris. Deborah died on Nov. 24 of ovarian cancer.

    For each of the several hundred people who attended her memorial service at Bryan Community Center on Saturday, Dec. 5, Deborah Benning meant something unique. But in all her roles as mother, step-mother, partner, friend, Village Council clerk and long-time village resident, she was consistently seen as a supportive leader and a touchstone others could depend on. She served in that way for family and friends as well as for the Village of Yellow Springs, and her death on Nov. 24 is as much a part of local history as the legacy of her family as an early part of the village’s African American community.

  • Malagasy student visits YS

    Jalana Lazar’s stint with the Peace Corps in Madagascar began inauspiciously. On her first day in the country, she was driven to the village of Nosiarina and dropped off with little fanfare. Remembering her initial dismay, she said, “They left me on the side of the road with a bike and my steel trunk.” She figured out the logistics of her new life on her own.

  • Parents start local Montessori

    Chaos reigned on a recent Wednesday in the Bryan Center gym, where a toddler play group meets each week. Balls were flying and kids caromed off of each other as mothers stood by watchfully. Then a box of curious looking toys were spread out, and one by one, the children came to sit on their mats and check out the shapes, colors and moving parts of the materials before them. The children were rapt, and according to Nacim Sajabi, they were learning in the Montessori model.

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because you can be yourself, no matter where you are in the village.

  • Event to celebrate ‘Best Hometown’

    Yellow Springs is the best hometown because we embrace the spirit of community. We are a town where neighbors help one another in good times and bad, and where one person’s voice can truly make a tangible difference.

  • Top library hopes for support

    Call him crazy, but Greene County Public Library Director Karl Colón believes that the library ought to serve the taxpayers who support it. When the people said in a 2005 survey that they wanted more youth programs, better communication and a bigger collection, the Yellow Springs library started console game madness for teens, gussied up its newsletter and Web site and started ordering more books.

  • Patterson honor: celebrating others

    You could call Faith Patterson a woman with a passion for bringing people together. As a leader of the African-American Cultural Works, or ACCW, she’s been pursuing that passion for more than a decade, spearheading such community-building events as Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, the recent Roots brunch, and the upcoming annual AACW Blues/Jazz Fest.

  • A lifetime of making a difference

    On an ordinary street in town, there is an ordinary brick ranch with two ordinary maple trees planted in the front yard. But inside this ordinary house is a woman with an unordinary history. It’s a personal history that reflects advances in civil rights and decolonization. It’s the history of one woman with a pioneering spirit, keen leadership skills and a love of learning.