History Section

  • Architectural bike tour— Builder Kline left mark on village

    Local residents Martha Kline, Jack Kline’s daughter, and her son, Andrew, recently visited one of the best known Yellow Springs homes designed by Martha’s father. On Saturday, July 26, Turner Foundation historian Kevin Rose will lead an architectural tour of some of Kline’s local works, including Yellow Springs High School and the Vernet Ecological Center at Glen Helen. Due to popularity, this month’s bicycle tour will be followed by a second tour in September, at a date to be determined. Visit ­ westcotthouse.org for details or to purchase tour tickets. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Perched on a cliff side in the woods on Old Mill Road sits a house made almost entirely of glass and so close to the trees that its designer and original owner, John L. (Jack) Kline, had only to reach out his window to touch the birds.

  • Annual vintage truck show

    1957GMC

    Ertel Publishing’s Vintage Truck Magazine will host its 13th annual Vintage Truck Show which is a great family-friendly event! Featuring colorful and restored trucks from the early 1900s through modern times.

  • Phyllis Jackson to be honored

    For years, Phyllis Lawson Jackson has been the “go-to” person for local history. The appeal of a historical perspective, she believes, is that even as history teaches us about the past, it also helps illuminate the present.

  • Braving cold to show solidarity

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    Cold temperatures didn’t keep away villagers from taking part in Monday’s annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day walk and service. See more photos.

  • YS News press runs again, in Iowa

    The Yellow Springs News' Miehle press at the Printer's Hall in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.

    A little known fact about the YS News’ old press: it’s still printing!

  • Bubbles and Beer

    From the Yellow Springs News, 1966

    Well, the bubbles were then and the beer is now. Check out the bicycle on the far left of the ad, you can sit there now and order a beer at Peach’s on Xenia Ave.

  • Present gives voices to village past

    The Yellow Springs downtown of the early 1900s is superimposed on the Yellow Springs of today. In the same way, the village’s past comes alive on the Web pages of local history blogs started in recent years. The historical photo (c.1910) was taken from approximately the same location looking north on Xenia Avenue 100 years ago. Visible are the traction line, built in 1902, the Independent Order of the Odd Fellows building and new cement sidewalks. Visit ysnews.com for more photos in the “Past and Present” series. (Historical photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College; photo by Megan Bachman)

    Yellow Springs’ founders and early settlers didn’t have Internet — they probably couldn’t have imagined it — but later generations are now using it to imagine the lives of former villagers.

  • Mill reopens with new management

    Jim Hammond and Randy Gifford have teamed up, with help from friends and family, to reopen an expanded Grinnell Mill Bed & Breakfast. The mill will also hold open house hours on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When Antioch University no longer knew what to do with the dilapidated Grinnell Mill, Jim Hammond stepped in and devoted considerable time and personal resources to restore it, plank and nail.

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