May
28
2015
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Wednesday
High 84° / Low 61°
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
High 84° / Low 63°

Land & Environmental Section

  • Whitehall Farm inspires fun, play

    Local kids, from left Rebecca, William and Josie DeWine and Dane Beal hung out with the cows of Whitehall Farm, a 940-acre property just north of the village that was saved from development in 1999. The Tecumseh Land Trust, which played a major role in preserving the land, will host a Family Fun Day at Whitehall on Sunday, May 10, with games, food, historical tours and horse-drawn carriage rides. (Submitted photo by Ara Beal)

    After more than two centuries, the historic Whitehall Farm has many stories to tell. But it’s the story about how a small town raised more than one million dollars in six weeks to purchase and preserve the farm in 1999 that continues to inspire both villagers and a local land trust whose early work was defined by it.

  • Aim is for a zero-waste Village

    Local recycling expert Tom Clevenger recently tumbled his compost barrel, which he uses to recycle his household’s kitchen scraps. Clevenger is working with other villagers to improve the town’s poor recycling record and find other ways to reduce and reuse waste here. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Is it possible to not produce any garbage — or purchase any stuff — for one year? A Vancouver couple did just that in 2009, and now it’s inspiring Yellow Springers to cut their waste too.

  • Springs bring busy bees

    bees3

    The buzz is that spring’s finally here.

  • On the next day of Christmas, nature gave to us, 268 Carolina Chickadees

    Northern Flicker

    The 2014 Christmas Bird Count yielded about 57 species and nearly 5,000 birds in the 15-mile count circle around Yellow Springs.

  • Ash trees felled in John Bryan State Park

    The emerald ash borer, an invasive species native to Asia, was discovered in North America in 2002, and has been infecting Ohio trees since as early as 2003. (Photo: http://www.agri.ohio.gov/eab)

    The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, or ODNR, began removal of a number of ash trees impacted by the invasive emerald ash borer, or EAB, from John Bryan State Park yesterday, Dec. 8.

  • Scientist finds new ash borer host

    Wright State University Biology Professor Dr. Don Cipollini pointed out his groundbreaking discovery that the white fringe tree can be a host for the emerald ash borer. Cipollini was the first to publish research and convince the U.S. EPA to confirm the white fringe tree as the only other known host for the invasive beetle. Trees planted along the bike path and elsewhere in the village were instrumental to his discovery. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A local white fringe tree planted along the bike path is now famous as the second documented host of an invasive beetle that was thought to only prey upon ash trees.

  • Glen Helen welcomes volunteers to Honeysuckle Daze

    Glen volunteer Vincent Laino helped to clear invasive honeysuckle from the Glen over the summer.

    Among its various efforts to remove invasive species this year, the Glen invites volunteers to join its annual Honeysuckle Daze on Saturday, Nov. 15.

  • Learn seed-saving during a tomato walk at Antioch

    Antioch students tour high-calorie perennial grain crops at the Land Institute in Salina, Ks. (Submitted photo)

    Antioch College students will share seed-saving technique for tomatoes during a Tomato Walk at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, on the Antioch farm.

  • Land trust to host farm succession seminar

    Mcnally farm

    Over 70% of family farms don’t make it to the next generation. A local seminar on Aug. 27 aimed at area land owners hopes to curtail the trend.

  • A plug for pollinators in Yellow Springs

    Echinacea and bee

    Representatives of the Yellow Springs Pollinator Regeneration Project last week gave a very different talk about the birds and the bees than the one we may have heard as children.