Land & Environmental Section :: Page 13

  • Company seeks local oil, gas

    Traffic was disrupted for several days last month on West Enon and North Fairfield Roads just north of Yellow Springs as a large truck took seismic readings of rock formations thousands of feet below the roadways.

  • Yellow Springs could recycle more

    Rumpke’s recycling facility on Monument Drive in Dayton whirred with the movement of belts, lifts, pulleys and crushers last month operating to support the sorting, mashing and packaging of waste materials to be shipped off and repurposed for another use. Recycling is alive in Yellow Springs, but it could be better. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Yellow Springs has a relatively good recycling track record; Yellow Springers recycle about twice as much as residents of Germantown and about three times as much as Xenia residents.

  • New firm aims big for local solar

    From left, Scott Lindstrom, Shannon Lindstrom and Paul Wren launched their new company, Yellow Springs Renewable Energy, at a public forum last month. The local company, here with a solar photovoltaic panel, aims to provide residential, commercial and village-scale solar power.

    In October, a new local company, Yellow Springs Renewable Energy, held a public forum to educate the community on the renewable energy revolution taking place in the country and state their goal of leading that renewable energy revolution locally.

  • Living green at Purple Moon Farm

    Sophie Entler and some of her hoofed friends at the Purple Moon Farm, which her parents, James Entler and Jessica Wyant, run on Meredith Road.

    On a recent afternoon, the sheep and goats at Purple Moon Farm are dozing in their pens. A hen wanders by, two middle-sized chicks close behind her; other chickens rest in the shade of the raspberry bushes planted in parallel rows.

  • Recycling grows at Rumpke

    Pure glass at the end of Rumpke's recycling process. (Photos by Lauren Heaton)

    Several Village Environmental Commission members paid a visit to several Rumpke sites last month, including the recycling center in Dayton, to get an update on what happens to the waste and recycling materials that get collected curbside in Yellow Springs. (photos by Lauren Heaton)

  • Land trust garners praise

    Tecumseh Land Trust’s Associate Director, Michele Burns, met with federal Farm and Ranch Land Protection Program Director Mark Rose, left, and Matt Harbage, the program’s state manager. TLT received more funds from the federal agency in 2010 than any other land trust in the state. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    The director of the largest federal funding source for farmland preservation stopped in Yellow Springs last week to visit Ohio’s top recipient of federal funding, the Tecumseh Land Trust, which he praised as one of the nation’s top land trusts.

  • TLT’s Magaw honored as Ambassador of Ohio Agriculture

    Tecumseh Land Trust Executive Director Krista Magaw accepts her award as an Ambassador to Ohio agriculture from Robert Biggs, director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture at the 11th Annual Ohio Farmland Preservation Summit last week in Columbus. (Submitted Photo)

    At the Ohio Annual Farmland Preservation Summit last Thursday, Nov. 18, the Tecumseh Land Trust’s executive director Krista Magaw was named an Ambassador of Ohio Agriculture for her nearly 10 years as director of one of the state’s most successful land trusts.

  • Vectren grants $25,000 to Glen Helen Ecology Institute

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    Schoolchildren throughout the Miami Valley will have new opportunities to learn in Glen Helen, thanks to a partnership announced on Nov. 15 between Vectren and Antioch College.

  • Invasion of the tall tree snatchers

    Honeysuckle leaves

    This month is the best time to get rid of the invasive honeysuckle throughout the village, when the shrub is at it’s most vulnerable period.

  • Northern bike trail to close

    As of Thursday, Nov. 18, the Little Miami Scenic Trail, also known as the bike path, will be closed north of Jackson Road indefinitely. The action was sparked by the Election Day failure of a .153-mill levy to raise funds for the Clark County Park District.

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