Land & Environmental Section :: Page 15

  • The 3 percent solution for energy use

    When the Village’s electric power supplier looks into the future, its leaders assume that the village’s need for electricity will increase by about 1 percent each year. But with much of the supply currently coming from carbon–emitting coal plants, villagers and Village leaders have been looking for ways not to be such predictable power consumers.

  • Last moth treatment complete

    The crop duster that flew over the village several times last week wasn’t aiming for crops, but rather the furry brown and white gypsy moths that have been dining voraciously on the area’s oak trees.

  • The ‘can man’ recycles as ‘homage to Mother Nature’

    Longtime villager and former Antioch College faculty member Michael Kraus recently collected several hundred discarded aluminum cans on a 50-mile trip down the bike trail, a typical load for the ride he takes three times a week.

    While a high school Latin teacher in Cincinnati, Michael Kraus couldn’t stand to watch students throw their soda cans in the trash. So he spent his afternoons digging through garbage bins to retrieve and recycle them.

  • A solar pioneer, paving the way

    On her roof on Stewart Drive, Pat Brown’s 10 new solar panels convert the sun’s rays into electricity and send it to the Yellow Springs electric grid. She is the first Greene County resident to install grid-tied solar photovoltaic panels. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Thirty years ago, Pat Brown was arrested while marching for peace. Now she finds herself again on the front lines — this time of an alternative energy revolution — as the first resident in Yellow Springs to install grid-tied solar photovoltaic panels.

  • CSAs for good food, local focus

    Doug Christen plants summer squash seeds at Smaller Footprint Farm, a certified “naturally-grown” farm that supplies vegetables for 30 local families. Farm shares, which cost $425 for 20 weeks of fresh produce, are available for the 2010 season. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Both Smaller Footprint Farm and Heartbeat Community Farm have thrived since going into business in 2006 by growing vegetables directly for their members using a model called Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA for short.

  • Land trust guest speaker advises sustainable farming

    David Montgomery

    Professor and author David Montgomery thinks everyone should be concerned about where their food comes from and how its grown. In his presentation for the Tecumseh Land Trust’s “Stories of People and the Land” series on Tuesday night, the soil expert urged no-till, organic farming practices that preserve local agricultural soils rather than deplete them.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.

  • Birding by ear, Glen tallies 80 species

    A great horned own perched in the cavity of a sycamore along the river in the south Glen about two weeks ago, waiting like the mice it hunts for spring to warm all creatures out of their hovels. (photo by Patricia Perry)

    Though the whipping, chilly wind didn’t feel like early May, the birds of Glen Helen puffed out their down and went ahead and sang anyway for the fourth annual Make It Count for the Birds fundraiser bird count on Saturday.

  • Clifton Gorge finds local friends

    Cedarville resident Matthew McNelly, left, is partnering with several residents in Yellow Springs to start the Friends of Clifton Gorge to support Southwest District Preserve Manager Shannon Hoffer to protect the gorge during a time of steep state budget cuts.

    Down in the Clifton Gorge on a sunny Friday last month, the snow trillium matted the ridges sloping into the canyon, drawing area hikers eager to enjoy the first breath of spring. And though it was his day off, Southwest District Preserve Manager Shannon Hoffer was out on the trails too, educating visitors about the importance of staying on the path…

  • Green Fair activates bodies, minds and electrodes

    Chays Robinson, Dayton, tried out the STEM School's Energy Bike at Saturday's Green Fair. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The second annual Green Fair on Saturday, April 24, attracted about 200 to 250 people who came to the Glen Helen Building to see, touch and learn about environmental consciousness. About 25 booths, including seed start planting, aluminum can crushing, recycled newspaper hat making and snake charming, engaged participants with interactive educational displays. The event […]

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