Land & Environmental Section :: Page 16

  • Land trust guest speaker advises sustainable farming

    David Montgomery

    Professor and author David Montgomery thinks everyone should be concerned about where their food comes from and how its grown. In his presentation for the Tecumseh Land Trust’s “Stories of People and the Land” series on Tuesday night, the soil expert urged no-till, organic farming practices that preserve local agricultural soils rather than deplete them.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.

  • Birding by ear, Glen tallies 80 species

    A great horned own perched in the cavity of a sycamore along the river in the south Glen about two weeks ago, waiting like the mice it hunts for spring to warm all creatures out of their hovels. (photo by Patricia Perry)

    Though the whipping, chilly wind didn’t feel like early May, the birds of Glen Helen puffed out their down and went ahead and sang anyway for the fourth annual Make It Count for the Birds fundraiser bird count on Saturday.

  • Clifton Gorge finds local friends

    Cedarville resident Matthew McNelly, left, is partnering with several residents in Yellow Springs to start the Friends of Clifton Gorge to support Southwest District Preserve Manager Shannon Hoffer to protect the gorge during a time of steep state budget cuts.

    Down in the Clifton Gorge on a sunny Friday last month, the snow trillium matted the ridges sloping into the canyon, drawing area hikers eager to enjoy the first breath of spring. And though it was his day off, Southwest District Preserve Manager Shannon Hoffer was out on the trails too, educating visitors about the importance of staying on the path…

  • Green Fair activates bodies, minds and electrodes

    Chays Robinson, Dayton, tried out the STEM School's Energy Bike at Saturday's Green Fair. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The second annual Green Fair on Saturday, April 24, attracted about 200 to 250 people who came to the Glen Helen Building to see, touch and learn about environmental consciousness. About 25 booths, including seed start planting, aluminum can crushing, recycled newspaper hat making and snake charming, engaged participants with interactive educational displays. The event […]

  • No dog park at Ellis Park

    Ellis Park, the home of what many villagers consider a bird sanctuary and nature preserve, will not be the site of a dog park after all, following the April 19 Village Council meeting. At the meeting Council members voted to rescind the March vote that okayed Ellis as the dog park location, as had been proposed by two Yellow Springs High School seniors.

  • YSI receives Third Frontier grant

    YSI Incorporated is one of six statewide projects recently funded by the Ohio Department of Development’s Third Frontier grant, which seeks to spur economic development in Ohio, YSI leaders found out recently.

  • Antioch Underground

    Drilling on the front lawn of the Antioch College to determine the feasibility of using geothermal heating

    On Friday, April 9, employees of Crabtree Drilling of Springfield and Eaton Drilling of West Liberty drilled 300 feet down on the front lawn of the Antioch College campus in a first step toward determining the feasibility of using geothermal heating on campus. (Click on the headline to read more)

  • Neighborhood gardens grow community, savings

    Neighborhood gardens — shared plots for gardening with others near and within neighborhoods on Village-owned land — are new to Yellow Springs, and may be growing on land near you this year.

  • Green space funds go to Jacoby farm preservation

    At their March 1 meeting, members of Yellow Springs Village Council unanimously approved contributing to the preservation of two farm properties, one of which includes the headwaters of the Jacoby Creek and is the first farm preserved within the Jacoby greenbelt.

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