May
23
2015
Partly Cloudy
Saturday
High 77° / Low 55°
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
High 83° / Low 62°

Land & Environmental Section :: Page 16

  • In search of big trees

    Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly of the Tree Committee measured the large oaks, hickories and locust trees of Mills Lawn on a recent summer day. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s no a surprise that Yellow Springs has an abundance of large trees. This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee seeks the largest in their update to a 1972 report, “The big trees of Yellow Springs.” See a 1972 map of the largest trees in Yellow Springs here.

  • Glen Helen fundraiser dinner—Finally, a use for honeysuckle

    Villager Dennis Moore is shown with the three chairs he constructed from honeysuckle that was pulled from the Glen. The chairs will be auctioned this Saturday, July 17, at the “Whoo Cooks for You?” fundraiser event at Glen Helen. While the dinner tickets are expected to be sold out, preregistered callers may bid on the chairs. Register to bid by calling 769-1902 or online at www.whoocooksforyou.org.

    When the barred owl sings its inquisitive call “whoo cooks for you?” this weekend, the folks at Glen Helen will have an answer. At a long dinner table at the Raptor Center on Sunday, July 18, area diners in support of the Glen will sit down to enjoy a meal whose origins are both known and local with the area chefs and farmers who grew and prepared the food.

  • Green towns offer new ideas

    As sustainability gains ground as an integral component of city planning, many municipalities across the country are creating ways to use less energy and ensure that the energy they use comes from renewable sources.

  • The 3 percent solution for energy use

    When the Village’s electric power supplier looks into the future, its leaders assume that the village’s need for electricity will increase by about 1 percent each year. But with much of the supply currently coming from carbon–emitting coal plants, villagers and Village leaders have been looking for ways not to be such predictable power consumers.

  • Last moth treatment complete

    The crop duster that flew over the village several times last week wasn’t aiming for crops, but rather the furry brown and white gypsy moths that have been dining voraciously on the area’s oak trees.

  • The ‘can man’ recycles as ‘homage to Mother Nature’

    Longtime villager and former Antioch College faculty member Michael Kraus recently collected several hundred discarded aluminum cans on a 50-mile trip down the bike trail, a typical load for the ride he takes three times a week.

    While a high school Latin teacher in Cincinnati, Michael Kraus couldn’t stand to watch students throw their soda cans in the trash. So he spent his afternoons digging through garbage bins to retrieve and recycle them.

  • A solar pioneer, paving the way

    On her roof on Stewart Drive, Pat Brown’s 10 new solar panels convert the sun’s rays into electricity and send it to the Yellow Springs electric grid. She is the first Greene County resident to install grid-tied solar photovoltaic panels. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Thirty years ago, Pat Brown was arrested while marching for peace. Now she finds herself again on the front lines — this time of an alternative energy revolution — as the first resident in Yellow Springs to install grid-tied solar photovoltaic panels.

  • CSAs for good food, local focus

    Doug Christen plants summer squash seeds at Smaller Footprint Farm, a certified “naturally-grown” farm that supplies vegetables for 30 local families. Farm shares, which cost $425 for 20 weeks of fresh produce, are available for the 2010 season. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Both Smaller Footprint Farm and Heartbeat Community Farm have thrived since going into business in 2006 by growing vegetables directly for their members using a model called Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA for short.

  • Land trust guest speaker advises sustainable farming

    David Montgomery

    Professor and author David Montgomery thinks everyone should be concerned about where their food comes from and how its grown. In his presentation for the Tecumseh Land Trust’s “Stories of People and the Land” series on Tuesday night, the soil expert urged no-till, organic farming practices that preserve local agricultural soils rather than deplete them.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.