Land & Environmental Section :: Page 17

  • Vernay site cleanup plans reviewed

    It’s been seven years since Vernay Laboratories signed an order of consent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to remediate the contamination centered on the former manufacturing facility on Dayton Street. Since that time, the company has moved its rubber parts production to Georgia and South Carolina, torn down the Dayton Street plant, welcomed Ed […]

  • Land plan to manage growth

    Open farmland is a precious feature of Miami Township, whose vast fields, streams and wooded areas many of its residents recognize as valuable and would like to keep. So they’re doing something about it by creating a land use plan for the township, which surrounds Yellow Springs, in hopes of guiding future development practices that preserve and protect its natural resources.

  • FCC senior apartments put on hold

    The senior apartment building that Friends Care Community plans to build downtown has been delayed due to financing issues, Friends Care Director Karl Zalar said last week. Friends had hoped to break ground this spring on the project at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street.

  • Council split on land plan

    At the June 1 meeting of Yellow Springs Village Council, Council members differed sharply on the appropriateness of Council making changes in the Village Comprehensive Land Use Plan at this time. The plan was recently revised by the Planning Commission and submitted to Council for approval.

  • Alternative vet clinic is approved

    An alternative veterinary office will soon be a new business on the corner of Stafford and Union Streets, after Village Planning Commission approved at its Monday, June 8 meeting a proposal to turn an unoccupied house into a small clinic.

  • Birds on the brain

    On a day with lots of wind, birding experts and watchers counting species for the third Make It Count for the Birds event in the Glen on Saturday, May 9, surpassed last year’s data by one. The group charted a total of 89 species of birds, including one Tennessee oven bird, a wilson, a barred owl, blue herons (immature shown, top right), and lots of magnolia warblers and Baltimore orioles everywhere. The 40 to 50 birders added several new bird species to this year’s list, including a black vulture (a piece of data that supports the northern movement that species has been making), a Canada warbler, a yellow breasted chat and a wild turkey that one birder from Illinois saw sitting on its nest. Perhaps it was the wind, or the clouds, or the fact that many migrants just decided to pass up the Glen in hopes of better weather in Canada, but Saturday was “a really tough year for finding birds out there,” according to Glen Director Nick Boutis, who added that almost every warbler and more than half the birds counted were single sightings. “In other words, if you’d looked the other direction or happened not to hear that chirp, you’d have missed it.”

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Watching birds, helping the Glen The Glen in winter home to many birds — count on it State representatives call for […]

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • Green Fair touts Earth care

    “We’re trying to change our lives,” event organizer Rob Content said in a recent interview. He looked at Jorie Sieck, a youth organizer, and added, “as grownups, this is a challenge.” Content thinks that events like the Earth Day Fair bring people together, and that working together is what makes personal change possible.

    Living Green co-owner C.J. Williams defines “green” as anything with a focus on sustainability that is good for the Earth and good for individuals. More than 20 tables representing green individuals, green businesses and green non-profits are confirmed for the day, she said.

  • Gardens yield more than green

    Some members of the loosely-networked community gardening group are shown in the FCC garden. Pictured from left to right are: standing, back row: Meranda Pelzl, Corinne Pelzl, Daniel L. Pelzl, Rob Content and Doug ‘Thor’ Bailey. Middle row, seated: Faith Morgan, Eric Johnson, Jenny Haack, Max Banaszak-Moore, Bob Moore. Front row: McKenna Banaszak-Moore and Christine O. Roberts, Sally Palmer and Paul Webb.

    Some say starting a garden is an act of faith, a passive act done best when the moon is right. Others, like a new local community gardening group, plan for a good crop by building beds of e-mail list serves and germinating ideas at community potlucks.

    This loosely networked bunch of area gardening enthusiasts and hopeful amateurs has scattered seeds of intention across the village and Miami Township that just might sprout up in the form of shared gardens, seed swaps and educational activities near you.

  • YSI contaminants still linger

    Several vigilant groups of environmentalists received satisfactory news last week when they met with the team leading the bioremediation of contaminants spilled at the YSI campus on Brannum Lane in the early 1990s.

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