Land & Environmental Section :: Page 18

  • Birds on the brain

    On a day with lots of wind, birding experts and watchers counting species for the third Make It Count for the Birds event in the Glen on Saturday, May 9, surpassed last year’s data by one. The group charted a total of 89 species of birds, including one Tennessee oven bird, a wilson, a barred owl, blue herons (immature shown, top right), and lots of magnolia warblers and Baltimore orioles everywhere. The 40 to 50 birders added several new bird species to this year’s list, including a black vulture (a piece of data that supports the northern movement that species has been making), a Canada warbler, a yellow breasted chat and a wild turkey that one birder from Illinois saw sitting on its nest. Perhaps it was the wind, or the clouds, or the fact that many migrants just decided to pass up the Glen in hopes of better weather in Canada, but Saturday was “a really tough year for finding birds out there,” according to Glen Director Nick Boutis, who added that almost every warbler and more than half the birds counted were single sightings. “In other words, if you’d looked the other direction or happened not to hear that chirp, you’d have missed it.”

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Watching birds, helping the Glen The Glen in winter home to many birds — count on it State representatives call for […]

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • Green Fair touts Earth care

    “We’re trying to change our lives,” event organizer Rob Content said in a recent interview. He looked at Jorie Sieck, a youth organizer, and added, “as grownups, this is a challenge.” Content thinks that events like the Earth Day Fair bring people together, and that working together is what makes personal change possible.

    Living Green co-owner C.J. Williams defines “green” as anything with a focus on sustainability that is good for the Earth and good for individuals. More than 20 tables representing green individuals, green businesses and green non-profits are confirmed for the day, she said.

  • Gardens yield more than green

    Some members of the loosely-networked community gardening group are shown in the FCC garden. Pictured from left to right are: standing, back row: Meranda Pelzl, Corinne Pelzl, Daniel L. Pelzl, Rob Content and Doug ‘Thor’ Bailey. Middle row, seated: Faith Morgan, Eric Johnson, Jenny Haack, Max Banaszak-Moore, Bob Moore. Front row: McKenna Banaszak-Moore and Christine O. Roberts, Sally Palmer and Paul Webb.

    Some say starting a garden is an act of faith, a passive act done best when the moon is right. Others, like a new local community gardening group, plan for a good crop by building beds of e-mail list serves and germinating ideas at community potlucks.

    This loosely networked bunch of area gardening enthusiasts and hopeful amateurs has scattered seeds of intention across the village and Miami Township that just might sprout up in the form of shared gardens, seed swaps and educational activities near you.

  • YSI contaminants still linger

    Several vigilant groups of environmentalists received satisfactory news last week when they met with the team leading the bioremediation of contaminants spilled at the YSI campus on Brannum Lane in the early 1990s.

  • Glen reaches out for support

    Trailside Museum staffers Anne Marie Long and Geno Luketic’s mission is to help visitors to know and love the Glen, as well as to protect the preserve and its vulnerable ecology. The museum’s summer hours are from 1 to 7 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Saturday–Sunday.

    Fear of snakes is common, but visitors who have held gentle Pepper, the black rat snake who resides at Glen Helen’s Trailside Museum, know that most local snakes are harmless.

  • Park flowers into its first decade

    Volunteer gardeners at the Yellow Springs Women’s Park include, from left, Liz Milburn, Macy Reynolds, Helen Eier, Mary Cargan and Judy Williams. The park will celebrate its 10th anniversary this Sunday, July 13, from 2 to 4 p.m., at the garden on Corry Street.

    What if you were given the task to create a lasting monument to commemorate the contributions of a significant number of people? Instead of a bronze statue or marble marker, however, you decide to construct something different…

  • Village gardens bloom with summer sights this Sunday

    The home of Krista Magaw and her daughter Anna Carlson is featured in this Sunday’s Summer Bloom and Bounty tour. The event, a fundraiser for the Antioch School, costs $10. Tickets may be purchased at Current Cuisine, Sam and Eddie’s Open Books, Greenleaf Gardens and Stutzman’s Garden Center.

    The flower names from the various gardens read like a class roster from Antioch School. In one “classroom” there is Veronica, Spiraea, Yarrow and Daylily along with the Hosta triplets — Janet, June and Francee.

  • Organic farm principles, preservation draw TLT gathering

    If the bold colors and perfumes of spring provoke gratitude for the natural world, they should also spark deep appreciation for the work it takes to keep it that way.

  • Green pricing offers power options

    Yellow Springs residents will soon have the opportunity to ensure that the cost of their share of household energy use goes to supporting renewable power sources like the sun, wind, waterways and landfill gas. Village Council on Monday, May 19, agreed to initiate a new “green pricing” program that will offer residents the option of […]

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