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Land & Environmental Section :: Page 4

  • Fighting West Nile in the village


    To keep the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus at bay, local groups are urging residents to remove mosquito breeding sites on their property.

  • Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

    Eco•Mental's recycle station in their downtown shop at 257 Xenia Ave.

    Eco•Mental is encouraging villagers to bring all unwanted electronics the first Saturday of each month for recycling.

  • Barr property burn delayed

    Twenty-seven members of the Miami Township Fire-Rescue squad participated in a controlled burn of the Rabbit Run farmhouse on Dayton Street all day Saturday, Aug. 7. The event was a training exercise led by Fire Chief Colin Altman, which lasted from 9 a.m. until about 4 p.m. and included four new fire instructors, including locals Chris Kitts and Lee Gillespie, who recently completed courses taught by Assistant Fire Chief Denny Powell at the Greene County Career Center. The department brought two fire engines, a tanker, a rescue truck and an ambulance for safety in the face of temperatures that climbed to 800–900 degrees. Five firefighters from Xenia and Sugarcreek Townships also participated.

    The controlled burn of the Barr property on Xenia Avenue has been rescheduled for May 5.

  • Springfield vs. Yellow Springs — Comparing two waters

    Like Yellow Springs, Springfield was named by early settlers for its abundant underground water resources, which on the surface manifest as gushing springs. The groundwater aquifers tapped for drinking water by both communities remain highly productive today.

  • Judge for Struewings, again

    A Greene County Common Pleas Court judge last week ruled in favor of Kenneth and Betheen Struewing in their case against the Village of Yellow Springs. The ruling upholds a decision rendered by a Greene County magistrate last April that the plaintiff’s property easement is valid, granting them one free Village water and sanitary sewer tap for their property on Hyde Road, which lies outside Village limits.

  • Glen, Tree Committee to talk pawpaws


    The Yellow Springs Tree Committee will sponsor a program on growing pawpaws tomorrow, March 30, at 2:30 p.m. at the Vernet Ecological Center.

  • Wasp named for ‘lord of the flies’

    In the 1979 science fiction horror film Alien, a parasitic extraterrestrial bursts out of an astronaut’s chest, killing him, in the film’s iconic scene. The lifecycle of parasitic insects is not much different, according to Wright State entomologist and Yellow Springs resident John Stireman.

  • Easement to protect Glen for good

    With the support of a resounding 10 nonprofit, state and local government agencies, as well as $1.6 million in secured funding, the Glen has taken its first step into the protective fold of a permanent conservation easement.

  • Planners limit tiny homes

    In response to the question, “how small can a house be in Yellow Springs?” Village Planning Commission on Monday night chose to split the difference between those who favor and those who oppose allowing tiny houses in the village.

  • Pining for a resistant strain

    Yellow Springs Tree Committee members Anna Bellisari and Robert Gage enjoyed a rare view of Dayton Street and beyond from the height of a bucket truck last week. They went to the upper stories of an unusually strong and resilient Austrian pine to get clippings they will use to reproduce and potentially commercialize. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Village resident Robert Gage doesn’t relish heights, but even hovering at 70 feet in the air last week, he appeared less concerned with the drop than with the fertility of the newest shoots he was clipping.