Jul
30
2016
Partly Cloudy
Saturday
High 85° / Low 65°
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Sunday
High 84° / Low 64°

New Faces Section

  • Living, learning in the real world

    Alexandra Scott, known in Yellow Springs as Alex, posed outside the Spirited Goat on a recent afternoon. The Dayton Street coffeehouse is one of her favorite village haunts. A poet, activist and events coordinator extraordinaire, Scott moved here in 2012 and has gradually made the village her home. (Photo by audrey Hackett)

    Meet Alexandra Scott: event planner, poet, activist, coffeehouse lover, future entrepreneur, villager.

  • From ‘the last frontier’ to Ohio

    The Oberg family, from left, Eric, Cole, Kelley and Sage (plus 17-year-old dog, Larsen), moved to Yellow Springs in 2014 seeking an open and tolerant community. Intrepid adventurers, Eric, born and raised in Alaska, and Kelley, who lived there for many years, are “homesteading” on a small scale at their Fair Acres residence, including by planting the gardens pictured here. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Before moving to Yellow Springs, Eric and Kelley Oberg had never owned a home with a doorbell.

  • Artist family makes it work in Yellow Springs

    Artist Anna Burke and musician Ryan Stinson, with their daughter, Presley, 18 months, on a recent evening at the laundromat on Dayton Street. Burke and Stinson each moved to Yellow Springs in 2012 from nearby communities. They met here and have begun to build a life in the village, loving the community and navigating the challenges of housing, employment, parenthood and pursuing their art. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    Anna Burke, her husband, Ryan Stinson, and their daughter, Presley, are a young family whose appreciation for Yellow Springs has evolved over their four years in the village.

  • Finding room to write, and grow in Yellow Springs

    Poets Christopher DeWeese and Heather Christle moved to the village in 2013 after DeWeese accepted a teaching job at Wright State. Here, they play with their daughter, Harriet, who was born in Yellow Springs in 2014 and is already a regular at the Emporium, Sunrise Café and the public library. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    WHY YS? This is the fourth article in an occasional series looking at why people choose to live in Yellow Springs.

  • WYSO brings family to town

    The first thing Toylyn, Basim and Malcolm Blunt did when they moved into their house on North Stafford Street was light incense and candles as a way to prepare the space and bring positive energy to their new home.

  • Village a comfortable bicultural fit

    Yukio and Enshané Nomoto moved to Yellow Springs from Japan, seeking a diverse, safe and progressive community. They’re shown at their home with their children, Yukim and Yukaiyo. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When Enshané Nomoto was looking for a place to settle near her new job last year, she got an obscure recommendation from a classmate she hardly knew to visit Yellow Springs. She didn’t know what to expect. She and her husband, Yukio, were looking for a place that was progressive…

  • From Beirut to a bicycle village

    Author and Central State professor Jayson Iwen and yoga teacher Jovana Bouche Iwen are new residents of Yellow Springs. They’re shown with their son, Marlow. (Photo by Brooke Bryan)

    The Iwens are used to feeling the air move against their faces, and to these new villagers, the air in Yellow Springs has seemed sweet since the first encounter.

  • Caring for earth unites new YS family

    NEW FACES SERIES: Several of Volker Bahn’s colleagues suggested Yellow Springs as an ideal place to relocate when he accepted a faculty position at Wright State University, and it seems that they were right. The rustic feel of the Greene County countryside and proximity to Glen Helen has been a perfect fit for Bahn and wife Deanna Newsom’s lifestyles. Newsom works from home for the Rainforest Alliance, a New York-based conservation group that focuses on involving businesses and consumers in efforts to get responsibly produced goods and services into the global marketplace.

  • Loading dock brings sculptor to YS

    Woodworker, sculptor and architectural designer Tom Hawley works on a sculptural bowl in his workspace at Millworks Business Center. Hawley’s work is on display at The Cannery Art and Design Center in Dayton and the Malton Gallery in Cincinnati.

    Massive logs lay outside the artist’s workspace, quietly waiting their turn to be carved, chiseled, shaped, shaved, sanded, planed and polished into a gallery of finely finished forms. The logs were recently recovered from a fallen Catalpa tree on the grounds of the Westcott House in Springfield, a unique example of the prairie-style architecture made famous by Frank Lloyd Wright.

  • Way opening for family in YS

    The Gravley-Novellos left the frenetic pace of the Washington, D.C. area and moved to Yellow Springs in July 2008. From left are: Tony, Lori and Connor with their dogs Cody, Olive and Maggie.

    Four years ago, Tony Novello was a visitor to Ohio, en route to a golf tournament with a colleague from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. While his friend drove, the Maryland resident took in the sights.

Page 1 of 212