Village Life Section :: Page 22

  • Year in review 2012: Village tackles heat, health, trees

    Year in review 2012: Village tackles heat, health, trees

  • Village ball drop coming soon

    Revelers gathered on New Year's Eve a year ago for the annual Yellow Springs Ball Drop.

    The annual Yellow Springs Ball Drop will take place beginning at 11:45 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 31, at the intersection of Xenia Avenue and Short Street downtown. Everyone is welcome.

  • Glen seeks bird count volunteers

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    Glen Helen leaders seek volunteers for their annual Greene County Christmas Bird Count, to take place Saturday, Dec. 29, from 8 am to 2 p.m.

  • To new healer, the eyes have it

    Herbalist and iridologist Eric Rodriguez opened a new healing practice in town, the Culpeper House, this month. He will give a free lecture on natural approaches to winter health on Thursday, Dec. 20, at 6 p.m. in the meeting room at the Yellow Springs Public Library. Rodriguez can identify health issues by looking at a client’s iris. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Some see eyes as windows to the soul, while others, like local iridologist Eric Rodriguez, also see the iris as a window into the body, revealing a person’s health history, unhealthy habits and future illnesses.

  • Moments that make our community

    “Yellow Springs moments,” those times especially rich in community feeling, this year included, from top clockwise, the Davis Street block party in August; Ashlea and Hailey Roe painted “head art” on Susan Gartner; Melissa Heston led the Yellow Springs Pride parade in July; and during last February’s public art performance “The Kiss,” Corinne Totty received kisses from her mother, Tamar Totty, and grandmother, Kipra Heerman. (Photos by susan gartner except bottom, from the News archives by Lauren Heaton)

    For our annual holiday story, the News staff asked villagers to describe a 2012 “Yellow Springs moment,” that is, a time when they felt an especially strong sense of community in the village

  • Herbalist to speak at library

    Herbalist and iridologist Eric Rodriguez opened a new healing practice in town, the Culpeper House, this month. Rodriguez identifies health issues by a looking at a client’s iris and prepares them specially-forumlated herbal tinctures. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Local herbalist and iridologist Eric Rodriguez will give a free talk on natural approaches to winter health on Thursday.

  • Villagers share the holiday spirit

    Debbie Henderson is one of the community volunteers who helps to organize Share the Joy, a holiday gift-giving project located at the Yellow Springs Library that provides gifts for needy villagers. See page 4 for details. (Photo by Jeff Simons)

    What began more than 20 years ago with a small group of local volunteers collecting fruit baskets for low-income families has evolved into a program—Share the Joy—whereby struggling families in Yellow Springs can request essential gifts for themselves and their children.

  • Energy efficiency within reach

    Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy of Community Solutions are completing a new film, A Building Revolution: The Super-insulated Passive House, about ways builders and engineers around the world have developed to reduce home energy use by 80–90 percent. The film features local builders, such as Chris Glaser, above, working on a deep energy retrofit of the carriage house behind Community Solution in 2008. (Submitted photo)

    When Pat Murphy came to Yellow Springs in 2003, he said he could build a house that operated with 50 percent less fossil fuels than a conventional home, but his partner, Faith Morgan, didn’t believe him. Now, 10 years later, the couple is wrapping up a new film about homes built in Yellow Springs and around the country that use 90 percent less energy to heat and cool than conventional dwellings.

  • Presbyterians host a musical cabaret for the holidays

    Jim Felder and the 'Presbees'

    The Holiday Extravaganza will feature musical performances, wine and refreshments.

  • Let furniture rise from the ashes

    The coming decimation of the village’s ash tree population by an invasive Asian beetle — a kind of “Arborgeddon” for a tree that represents about one out of every 10 in our canopy — is a dismal story. Many beloved trees — on Mills Lawn, at the Antioch College campus, in the Glen — have already died. Others are showing signs of stress.