Village Life Section :: Page 29

  • Plan dropped; wellhead likely safe

    Sometime in 1988, a host of volatile organic chemicals were found deep in the aquifer that feeds the Village’s municipal drinking water wells. Around the same time, the federal government mandated safeguarding the quality of the groundwater.

  • Borer likely dooms ash trees

    Nick Boutis, director of Glen Helen, last week identified some of the ash trees downtown, including this large ash outside the Jackson Lytle and Lewis Funeral Home on Xenia Avenue. The trees are at risk from the Emerald Ash Borer, and experts believe that if the insects ­ — which have killed millions of trees in Michigan and Ohio — aren’t already in the village, they will be soon. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Many majestic canopy trees around the village are ash trees. And if they’re not already infested with the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, they will be soon. Within a few years, they’ll be dead.

  • Villagers weigh in on their water

    Ask villagers about their experience with Yellow Springs water and the stories will flow.

  • Musical event benefits cancer patients near and far

    jennie hudson

    Peach’s Grill will host a day’s worth of music on Saturday, May 26, noon to 2 a.m., to benefit local resident Jennie Hudson, who was recently diagnosed with colon cancer. Hudson will also be collecting donations for her participation in Relay For Life, which raises funds for cancer patients, on July 13. Said Hudson: “I’m not the only one going through this.”

  • YS News Water Survey Results

    WaterRatingsFull2

    See the results from a recent Yellow Springs News online survey of 205 municipal water customers.

  • Tackling hard water, hard choices

    Of all the critical decisions made by municipal governments, perhaps no decisions are more important than those concerning water.

  • New pastor leads King center

    errick Weston was recently named the new pastor of the First Presbyterian Church as well as director of the Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom at Antioch College. (Photos by Lauren Heaton)

    This month in separate but coordinated moves, Derrick Weston was hired as the new pastor of the First Presbyterian Church as well as the new director of Antioch College’s Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom.

  • Senior housing off, for now

    An effort to build affordable senior housing on the Barr property downtown was thwarted last month when the project was denied its request for 2012 federal tax credits. However, project organizers consider the set-back only a delay, as they plan to re-apply in 2013.

  • Johnson teaches power of the stars

    Local astrologer Jennifer Johnson will give a free introduction to astrology on Saturday, May 12 at 2 p.m. at the Yellow Springs Library. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Understanding the energy between the planets and how they affect us can help us to live more positive lives. That is Jennifer Johnson’s belief, and the reason she got interested in astrology 20 years ago.

  • Green space funds waning

    A state program used to preserve area farmland for a decade has been halted, hindering a local land trust’s efforts to protect land from development.

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