Village Life Section :: Page 31

  • Interim chief comes out of retirement

    Former Beavercreek Police Chief Art Scott has come out of retirement (for the second time) to take the position of interim Yellow Springs police chief, following the retirement last week of John Grote. Scott anticipates that his interim position will last three to six months, and he has not yet decided whether to apply for the permanent position. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Former Beavercreek Police Chief Arthur Scott is the Yellow Springs Interim Police Chief, taking the place of John Grote, who retired last week.

  • Bender honored for WWII service

    Villager Jonas Bender will be honored soon for his World War II military service, when he was part of the first group of African Americans to join the Marines. Called the Montford Point Marines, the group was subjected to racism and segregation while in the military. The group will receive the Congressional Gold Medal this spring for its contributions to the war effort. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    As a boy growing up in Mississippi, Jonas Bender knew about racism and segregation. But living in “the oasis of integration” that was the college town of Tougaloo, Bender knew about racism mainly from other people’s stories.

  • Spring has officially, and very quickly, arrived

    The bees were swarming a flowering tree in front of the Yellow Springs train station Wednesday. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Spring has sprung three to four weeks early this year, as evidenced by the billowy white pear trees downtown, which most often bloom in mid April.

  • Real watershed moments for area

    Hikers carefully navigated the stepping stones across Birch Creek in the Glen Helen Nature Preserve last weekend. The three local rivers that run through the Glen—Birch Creek, Yellow Springs Creek and the Little Miami River—drain runoff from village streets and area farms. Any contamination in the local watershed eventually makes its way into the Glen, impacting ecosystem health and recreational activities. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where Yellow Springs begins and ends is defined by clear political boundaries. But the village also exists within an ecosystem that has boundaries of its own. An important one is its watershed, an area of land that drains into a common waterway.

  • Glen adjusts course of events

    The annual Glen Helen pancake breakfast is one of several that Glen leaders are evaluating this year in order to streamline their activities

  • Village water, from the ground up

    Ted Dunevant, operator of the Yellow Springs water plant for the past 26 years, is retiring at the end of this month. He’s shown in the water plant’s pump house, the last stop for local water before it’s pumped into the village. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    You could say the Yellow Springs water system began about 425 million years ago, when a large inland sea covered the area.

  • Of sharing food and company

    Ruth Bent and Al Denman want to keep the local potluck tradition going by throwing community feasts on March 14, April 11 and May 9, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church’s Westminster Hall, 314 Xenia Avenue. All villagers are invited and should bring a dish to share and their own service. Here Antioch College students dine with villagers Tony Bent and Bev Price at weekly potlucks held last fall. (Submitted photo by Dennie Eagleson)

    At three upcoming potlucks, starting next week, villagers can share their cooking and enjoy the “luck of the pot.”

  • Community potlucks kick off

    030812_Potluck_YSNEWS-2

    Villagers are invited to three community potlucks taking place in the coming months. The first potluck is Wednesday, March 14.

  • Jonas Bender to be honored for military service

    Villager Jonas Bender will be honored this spring with the Congressional Medal of Honor for having been one of the original Montford Point Marines, the first group of African Americans to integrate the Marine Corps. He's shown with a recent book on the group of young men, who were subjected to racist and unequal treatment.grate the Marine Corps. He's shown with a recent book on the group of young men, who were subjected to racist and unequal treatment.

    Villager Jonas Bender will be honored this spring with the Congressional Medal of Honor for having been a part of the Montford Point Marines, the first group of African Americans to join the Marines, from the years 1943 to 1949.

  • Many issues of village water

    Water. We can’t live without it. But chances are, we don’t spend much time thinking about it. And questions regarding water quality are edging closer to Yellow Springs.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground