Village Life Section :: Page 55

  • YS Experience deemed success

    Doug Christen of Smaller Footprint Organics, a three-acre farm two miles north of Yellow Springs, shares his approach to sustainable farming at a tour of local farms organized as part of the Yellow Springs Experience by the Tecumseh Land Trust.

    That Yellow Springs would attract visitors to arts, wellness and eco-tourism activities didn’t surprise the organizers of the Yellow Springs Experience. But the nearly 20 local organizations that put together the 10-day educational event in mid-July did learn ways to improve upon its first effort.

  • Anthropologist studies island AIDS

    Township resident Lawrence Hammer, an anthropologist, recently published Sin, Sex and Stigma: A Pacific Response to HIV and AIDS, a book that recounts his research on Papua New Guinea. He’s shown signing his books at a recent reading in Xenia.

    Of the 26 countries in the insular Pacific, Papua New Guinea has the highest rate of HIV infection: 98 to 99 percent of new cases occur there, according to anthropologist and Wittenberg professor Lawrence Hammar. Yet, he said, the state can’t effectively address the problem because it fears offending outside aid organizations…

  • Big trees wanted in the village

    Yellow Springs Tree Committee members Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly are part of a summer effort by the committee to identify the biggest trees in the village. Villagers are invited to submit their contenders for the town’s biggest trees by calling Beverly at 767-2586.

    This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee is scouring the community for the next state champion tree. Several weeks ago, committee members Kathy Beverly and Macy Reynolds measured a 37-inch-circumference shagbark hickory at Mills Lawn School and a 55-inch-circumference oak tree on the Antioch campus, the largest yet.

  • In search of big trees

    Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly of the Tree Committee measured the large oaks, hickories and locust trees of Mills Lawn on a recent summer day. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s no a surprise that Yellow Springs has an abundance of large trees. This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee seeks the largest in their update to a 1972 report, “The big trees of Yellow Springs.” See a 1972 map of the largest trees in Yellow Springs here.

  • Yellow Springs kids play Fair to win

    Preparation for the annual Greene County Fair brings out the worker in Yellow Springs youth, who spend months to years on their living and non-living-projects. Above, Rachel Hammond and her dad Scott practiced leading Winnie, her year-old heifer who eats 25 pounds of grain a day and weighs in at 900 pounds. Below, Austin Pence nuzzled his heifer Mabel on his family’s 130-acre farm on Xenia Avenue just south of the Village water towers. The fair starts Sunday, Aug. 1. (photos by Lauren Heaton)

    At his family’s farm last week across from Dollar General, 16-year-old Austin Pence was using the cool of the dusk to wash and blow dry two of his favorite animals. Mabel, a year-old heifer, and Bart, a 17-month-old steer, hung by the white barn calm and collected as their black coats began to take on a fluffiness.

  • Standing up Saturdays for peace since 2002

    Terry Snider stands at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street every Saturday with his Earth flag and peace sign to oppose U.S. military action abroad. He is part of an informal group of protestors that has gathered at that corner from noon to 1 p.m. since late 2002. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    For an hour every Saturday, a small group of Yellow Springs residents takes to a street corner near downtown with a message of peace. Waving flags and holding signs with such sayings as “War is terrorism” and “Schools not bombs,” the peace activists get honks and hollers from passing motorists, along with the satisfaction that they are standing up for what’s right.

  • Eden World a place for creativity, relaxation

    Jennifer Horner relaxes in the lobby of her business Eden World, a walk-in wellness space on Xenia Avenue. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Visitors and residents alike can walk right-off-the-street into an oasis of health and rejuvenation at Eden World Center for Wellness and Discovery at 253 Xenia Avenue.

  • New building, same scouts

    A cardboard recruit proudly supports the newly dedicated Camp Birch facility (photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Camp Birch has recently remodeled its facilities thanks to the Turner Foundation of Springfield.

  • Food Pantry feeds local families in need

    Patty McAllister fills the food pantry in the basement of the Yellow Springs Methodist Church with food donated locally. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In troubled economic times, the Yellow Springs Community Food Pantry continues to offer free food and household goods to local families.

  • YSKP rehearses for ‘Oceans of Notions’

    Nia Stewart, right, Reese Elam, Marya Weigand and the 14-member cast of 'Oceans of Notions' rehearsed the snake dance at the Presbyterian Church on Monday. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    YSKP rehearsed for the summer’s second production, Oceans of Notions (Lakes of Mistakes), with visiting director Lenard Petit this week at the Presbyterian Church.

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