Village Life Section :: Page 58

  • A chicken farm to save the planet

    The chicks on New Liberty Farms on Mosier Road live in kid-size swimming pools lined with wood shavings and chirp sociably under warming lamps. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    When local resident Kat Krehbiel hatched the idea for a local food farm, chickens were only a small part of the plan.

  • YSKP invites adults to join the fun

    Local youth, from left, Joseph Minde-Berman, Phillip Diamond, Eliza Minde-Berman and Eve Diamond tried some of the dance movements they learned from YS Kids Playhouse dance teacher Jill Becker, right, with partner Doug Hinkley. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    YS Kids Playhouse is widening its scope this fall by opening up some of its youth dance classes to adults who want to boogie too.

  • Murphy examines cars, consumption

    Recently Pat Murphy of Community Solutions published his third book on energy conservation, Spinning Our Wheels, in which he examines myths about the electric car.

    Electric cars may not be the answer to reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, says local author Pat Murphy in his recently-released book, Spinning Our Wheels. Instead, Murphy proposes, we should share rides to increase transportation’s efficiency and reduce the number of total cars on the road.

  • Musical renewal for Havurah

    The spiritual activities of the Yellow Springs Havurah have always been done in an organized but less than dogmatic manner. The group of 15–20 active members observes the Sabbath each week on the Antioch College campus that informs its friendly tone.

  • Presbyterians throw birthday bash for community

    This photo, taken in the late 1800s, shows the 150-year-old santuary of the First Presbyterian Church as viewed from Walnut Street. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Yellow Springs First Presbyterian Church is throwing a 150th birthday party for the community that supported it through its long history on Friday, Sept. 3 from 7 p.m. to 9 on the church’s front lawn.

  • Bluesfest a cultural treasure

    DJ Smooth of the Ark Band performs at the 2006 Blues and Jazz Festival, begin held this year from Friday, Sept. 10 to Saturday, Sept. 11 at the Antioch Amphitheater. (Photo by Robert Hasek)

    In its 13th year, AACW’s Blues and Jazz Festival, offers a mix of returning artists and new acts sure to entertain, and educate, audiences.

  • Presbyterians celebrate 150th

    The Yellow Springs Presbyterian Church will celebrate its 150-year birthday on Friday, Sept. 3, from 7 to 9 p.m. on the church’s front lawn downtown. Church members, including above, from left, Jeanna Breza, Barbara Boettcher, Ruth Bent and Lloyd Kennedy, invite the public to attend the party for free cake, ice cream and lemonade.

    In 1855 the First Presbyterian Church was founded in Yellow Springs when Nancy Love, tired of going by horseback in bad weather to churches in Clifton and other nearby towns, successfully convinced her husband Robert to start, with other locals, a Presbyterian church here in town. Five years later, the members, for $5,000, built the church that still stands on Xenia Avenue today.

  • Scott named new Senior Center director

    Village native David Scott began his job as the new director of the Yellow Springs Senior Center on Monday, Aug. 23. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    With 20 years of experience in historic preservation and nonprofit management, local resident David Scott took on the position of director of the Yellow Springs Senior Center last week.

  • A group to support greening

    Kate LeVesconte showed off her garden and brand new bicycle carrier, which she fills with groceries from town for carbon-free transport to her home on Glen View Road. LeVesconte shares these energy conservation techniques at monthly meetings of the Ten Percent Club. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Clinical psychologist Kate LeVesconte knows that support groups encourage positive behavior. So when she became concerned about the dangers of carbon fuel use, LeVesconte co-created an energy conservation support group, where people help each other live more sustainably.

  • Ice cream social fun for children and seniors

    Volunteer Devin Massie chats with Friends Care residents happily consuming their ice cream at the annual ice cream social. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Crowds came for the free ice cream, face painting, balloons and carriage rides at Friends Care Community Center’s annual summer ice cream social last Sunday. Revived last year, the tradition dates back decades as a community event organized by the 33-year old senior institution.

The forecast for 45387 by Wunderground for WordPress