Village Life Section :: Page 68

  • DeWines long committed to Haiti

    Before the earthquake, Haiti was a country that struggled to support human life. Haiti was already the poorest country in the Americas by most standards; 80 percent of the people lived in poverty and many of those were malnourished or infected with AIDS or other diseases. And in the capital city of Port-au-Prince, about 400,000 people lived in the squalor of a lowland trash dump besieged with standing water, through which rag-clad children would dig for their daily sustenance.

  • Unstoppable Nonstop

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Snow — silent and not so silent Walking for the dream New spin on old tunes Faculty launches Nonstop Nonstop dialogues […]

  • Walking for the dream

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Snow — silent and not so silent Unstoppable Nonstop New spin on old tunes

  • Nonstop creatively evolves, again

    In autumn of 2008 a group of former Antioch College faculty, staff and students launched Nonstop Antioch, a radical educational experiment aimed at preserving the traditions and values of the college even after the campus was closed. The effort, supported by the college alumni board, offered classes and workshops to both traditional and non-traditional students in village churches, homes and cafés.

  • TLT celebrates 20 years with stories of the land

    From the middle of a field, the land looks different than the view from the road. Seen from the land owner’s perspective, the way the growers see it, one can just begin to understand what the birds and foxes see — open space without borders. That is also perhaps the way that painters and poets see the land when they articulate why it is so loved and valued.

  • Bulldog Sports Round-up

    The new year for the YSHS girls basketball team started out with a bit of a dud against Mechanicsburg, who came to town on Monday, Jan. 4, and left with a 56–51 victory. But Yellow Springs came back to crush Belmont 63–32 on Saturday, Jan. 9, to go ahead 4–3 for the season.

  • Snow — silent and not so silent

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Walking for the dream Unstoppable Nonstop New spin on old tunes

  • One dance step at a time for Colbert

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    Since being diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer nine months ago, Shelley Colbert has endured chemotherapy, major surgery and radiation treatment. Along with the resulting pain, fatigue and anxiety of those treatments, Colbert has grappled with another challenge as well — accepting help from the community where she grew up, raised her children, and cared for the children of others.

  • Bicycles, use the whole lane

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    Village Council’s goal to make Yellow Springs a more walkable and bikeable community prompted the Village Bicycle Enhancement Committee to take action on new traffic signs this fall and winter. The signs are a reminder that bicyclists are encouraged to use the entire lane.

    As head of the bike committee and an avid bicyclist himself, Dan Carrigan is passionate about educating both bikers and motorized drivers of the laws that give bicyclists greater rights and responsibilities.

    “As bicyclists, we’re being assertive,” he said. “The roads are a shared social network -— we all have a right to use them.”

  • Church harbors a market in winter

    While church basements tend to be the place for after-service coffee hours and socials, the basement of the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church will soon veer off the traditional path and host vegetables. Beginning this Saturday, Jan. 9, from 9 a.m. to noon, the church will sponsor its first winter farmers market.