Village Life Section :: Page 68

  • At Friends Community, sweet care and bittersweet holidays

    While Friends Care Community employees work hard all year long, they put in extra effort over the holidays, according to longtime restoration aide Kent Little, who has worked in the local nursing home for 23 years.

    “Employees try hard to make it a good Christmas for residents,” he said this week. “They take pride in what they do.”

  • More villagers seeking help

    Consumers may have tightened their belts this whole past year, but the longer the financial slump continues, the harder it is for those living close to the bone to get by. An increase in the number of people served by a group of local organizations that provide emergency welfare help reflects the increased difficulty local residents are having getting enough warm winter wear, adequate heat in the house and ample food on the table. Especially in a giving season, the local welfare leaders extend a thanks for the generosity of the community and a note that in an economy such as this one, everyone is dealing with the loss in some measure.

  • Carol of the bells

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Yellow Springs United Methodist Church Celebrates 175 Years Presbyterians throw birthday bash for community

  • Builders make aesthetic efficient

    Local business partners Erik and Deirdre Owen, left, and Ron Stickelman are finishing construction on the first spec home of their new development business, the Bau Wow Company. The home on King Street near Dayton Street is a modest-sized energy efficient home that the builders hope to sell and potentially reproduce.

    In many classic children’s stories, seemingly common and mundane entrances disguise the most fantastical places. For Alice, the gateway to Wonderland was through a rabbit hole, while the four Pevensie siblings discovered the bewitching world of Narnia through an old wardrobe. The driveway to Erik and Deirdre Owen’s home is no different. Looking (and feeling) […]

  • Benning served village in work, life

    Village Council Clerk Deborah Benning, right, with her mother, the late Etta Belle Harris. Deborah died on Nov. 24 of ovarian cancer.

    For each of the several hundred people who attended her memorial service at Bryan Community Center on Saturday, Dec. 5, Deborah Benning meant something unique. But in all her roles as mother, step-mother, partner, friend, Village Council clerk and long-time village resident, she was consistently seen as a supportive leader and a touchstone others could depend on. She served in that way for family and friends as well as for the Village of Yellow Springs, and her death on Nov. 24 is as much a part of local history as the legacy of her family as an early part of the village’s African American community.

  • Lotsa thanks

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Feature photo: Table for two…hundred?! Fair weather festivities Dancing near the streets ‘Red Pants’ dance Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’

  • Malagasy student visits YS

    Jalana Lazar’s stint with the Peace Corps in Madagascar began inauspiciously. On her first day in the country, she was driven to the village of Nosiarina and dropped off with little fanfare. Remembering her initial dismay, she said, “They left me on the side of the road with a bike and my steel trunk.” She figured out the logistics of her new life on her own.

  • Villagers question rise in airport noise

    The “deafening” and “brain rattling” sensation of an F-16 jet veering near town on a training mission is, some villagers say, an “assault on the nervous system”— an inescapable sensation that “penetrates the body” and sometimes rattles windows.

    Other villagers find the occasional low flyover to be a mere annoyance, or even a curiosity to count with the kids.

  • Plug pulled on power plant

    The Village made what some would call a wise and prescient decision last year when it declined to sign on to the coal-fired power plant American Municipal Power, Inc. planned to build along the Ohio River. AMP announced last week on Nov. 25 that it was terminating the AMPGS project due to a spike in construction cost estimates that rendered the project unaffordable for its customers.

  • Parents start local Montessori

    Chaos reigned on a recent Wednesday in the Bryan Center gym, where a toddler play group meets each week. Balls were flying and kids caromed off of each other as mothers stood by watchfully. Then a box of curious looking toys were spread out, and one by one, the children came to sit on their mats and check out the shapes, colors and moving parts of the materials before them. The children were rapt, and according to Nacim Sajabi, they were learning in the Montessori model.

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