Village Life Section :: Page 71

  • A lifetime of making a difference

    On an ordinary street in town, there is an ordinary brick ranch with two ordinary maple trees planted in the front yard. But inside this ordinary house is a woman with an unordinary history. It’s a personal history that reflects advances in civil rights and decolonization. It’s the history of one woman with a pioneering spirit, keen leadership skills and a love of learning.

  • Land plan to manage growth

    Open farmland is a precious feature of Miami Township, whose vast fields, streams and wooded areas many of its residents recognize as valuable and would like to keep. So they’re doing something about it by creating a land use plan for the township, which surrounds Yellow Springs, in hopes of guiding future development practices that preserve and protect its natural resources.

  • YS Kids Playhouse spotlights Bond, parkour movement

    YS Kids Playhouse kicks off its summer programming beginning Thursday at 7:30 p.m. with the opening show of A Price to Pay: Before Bond Became 007. Running for two consecutive weeks, Thursday through Sunday, the production, written by YSKP alum Daniel Malarkey, tells the story of the teenage James Bond and how he earned his lucky 007.

  • Outdoor sculpture contest winners — Public art to go public in October

    Local artists Beth Holyoke and Migiwa Orimo (shown sitting along the bike path on the newest tiled bench by Holyoke and local artist Kaethi Seidl) are two of the three winners of the recent Yellow Springs Outdoor Sculpture competition, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Arts Council, the Yellow Springs Center for the Arts Steering Committee and the Community Information Project. The third winner is Olga Ziemska of Cleveland. By the Fall Street Fair, public artwork by all three artists will be on display around the village.

    Most art is meant to be viewed by the public, but not all art takes up permanent residence in the public sphere in the way the three pieces that won the village’s first public sculpture contest are about to do. But come Street Fair time in early October, three public spaces in the village will display Beth Holyoke’s three-dimensional yellow mosaic of the word “springs,” Olga Ziemska’s sculpture of the hands of villagers cast in white in the image of a bird in flight, and Migiwa Orimo’s old-style telephone booth that beckons villagers to come inside and create their own experimental artworks.

  • Sunday liquor sales sought

    There is a small movement afoot to allow Sunday liquor sales and consumption in the downtown business district, which could significantly affect village restaurants and also local nonprofit organizations. The local option issue is one for the November ballot that needs approval from a majority of registered voters in the village to allow businesses in the downtown precinct to sell liquor on Sundays.

  • Iran turmoil hits home for some

    Villagers with family and friends in Iran have been watching the recent turmoil in that country closely. Among them are, shown above from left, new village resident Farideh Tahririha, holding her great-nephew Sameer Sajabi; Nacim Sajabi, who was raised in Yellow Springs, with her son, Mateen; and Mahshad Tahririha and her aunt, Farzaneh Mader, Nacim’s mother.

    When Nacim Sajabi had her first child several years ago, she surprised herself by speaking to her baby in Farsi, the language of Iran, her mother’s homeland. While Sajabi’s mother, Farzaneh Mader, and her aunts and grandmother had spoken Farsi to Sajabi as she grew up in Yellow Springs, she most often responded in English. But the birth of her firstborn seemed to spark inside her some deep connection with the language she didn’t even know she had.

  • The Great Strike of ’09

    Local slugger Eliza Minde-Berman exhibited profound determination as she eyed the ball in preparation for a big hit at a recent Perry League t-ball evening. Perry League, the noncompetitive beginners’ baseball program, continues each Friday evening from 6:30 until 8:30 at Gaunt Park; all local girls and boys aged 2–9, along with their parents, are invited.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: They went that-a-way! Commencement conviviality A real kicker Not quite game The confidence for the Conference

  • After 48 years, Dr. Englefield has retirement in his sights

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    After almost five decades as an optometrist, there’s just one thing that still knocks the socks off Dr. Robert Englefield — and that’s the miracle of human sight. “When you realize there’s this never-ending light that comes in and stimulates the eye and then sends messages to the brain that lets it become a vision — I’ve never stopped being amazed,” he said.

  • FCC senior apartments put on hold

    The senior apartment building that Friends Care Community plans to build downtown has been delayed due to financing issues, Friends Care Director Karl Zalar said last week. Friends had hoped to break ground this spring on the project at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street.

  • Fair weather festivities

    Beautiful warm and sunny weather lured an estimated 25,000 visitors to Yellow Springs on Saturday for the annual Spring Street Fair, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. Pictured above, clockwise from top left; Janet Mueller, front, and other members of the Egyptian Breeze belly dance troupe entertained a large and appreciative crowd on the lawn in front of Jackson Lytle & Williams; local young entrepreneurs Emma Reed, Tavien Clay and Youssef Reed hawked cold Cokes to the crowd; Walter Rhodes and his megaphone lured hungry visitors to the First Presbyterian Strawberry Festival; and Vivienne Jacobson, left, and her little sister, Adrienne, came with their family from New Holland for a festive day.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Dancing near the streets ‘Red Pants’ dance Little folk dancing Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’ Feature photo: Table for two…hundred?!

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