Village Life Section :: Page 72

  • Some villagers are in need

    In some ways, Yellow Springs has been insulated from the most profound aspects of the current economic turmoil. Overall, local housing prices have remained steady, foreclosures are few and several of the village’s largest businesses are linked to the relatively recession-proof industries of education and health care.

  • Life’s richness continues at 100

    On Tuesday, July 21, longtime villager Ruth Bean celebrated her 100th birthday. She is shown here at a party held last Sunday at Ruth’s home at Friends Care Community Assisted Living, with longtime friend and fellow North Dakotan Bev Price.

    Ruth Bean has lived long and fully, from teaching in a midwest country school to walking among lions in Africa. And if she doesn’t remember every detail, given that it’s been 100 years this week since her beginning, she is happy to relive parts of that journey with visitors who do.

  • Pool pass

    On a recent hot and humid summer day, lots of villagers, young, old and in-between, cooled off at the Gaunt Park pool. Shown here, Jyden Shuler tossed a ball to Sulayman Chappelle, who made a splash in his attempt to catch it.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com , or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Dancing near the streets ‘Red Pants’ dance Street Fair fare Feature photo: The blues and all that jazz Spring has […]

  • Cordell guilty in Harris death

    Just before his jury trial began on Monday, July 13, former Yellow Springs resident Phillip Cordell pled guilty to the 2004 murder of local resident Timothy Harris. Cordell, 48, was sentenced to a mandatory five years in prison, with no chance for judicial release, which is the maximum sentence for his plea, according to Greene County Prosecutor Suzanne Schmidt on Tuesday.

  • A lifetime of making a difference

    On an ordinary street in town, there is an ordinary brick ranch with two ordinary maple trees planted in the front yard. But inside this ordinary house is a woman with an unordinary history. It’s a personal history that reflects advances in civil rights and decolonization. It’s the history of one woman with a pioneering spirit, keen leadership skills and a love of learning.

  • Land plan to manage growth

    Open farmland is a precious feature of Miami Township, whose vast fields, streams and wooded areas many of its residents recognize as valuable and would like to keep. So they’re doing something about it by creating a land use plan for the township, which surrounds Yellow Springs, in hopes of guiding future development practices that preserve and protect its natural resources.

  • YS Kids Playhouse spotlights Bond, parkour movement

    YS Kids Playhouse kicks off its summer programming beginning Thursday at 7:30 p.m. with the opening show of A Price to Pay: Before Bond Became 007. Running for two consecutive weeks, Thursday through Sunday, the production, written by YSKP alum Daniel Malarkey, tells the story of the teenage James Bond and how he earned his lucky 007.

  • Outdoor sculpture contest winners — Public art to go public in October

    Local artists Beth Holyoke and Migiwa Orimo (shown sitting along the bike path on the newest tiled bench by Holyoke and local artist Kaethi Seidl) are two of the three winners of the recent Yellow Springs Outdoor Sculpture competition, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Arts Council, the Yellow Springs Center for the Arts Steering Committee and the Community Information Project. The third winner is Olga Ziemska of Cleveland. By the Fall Street Fair, public artwork by all three artists will be on display around the village.

    Most art is meant to be viewed by the public, but not all art takes up permanent residence in the public sphere in the way the three pieces that won the village’s first public sculpture contest are about to do. But come Street Fair time in early October, three public spaces in the village will display Beth Holyoke’s three-dimensional yellow mosaic of the word “springs,” Olga Ziemska’s sculpture of the hands of villagers cast in white in the image of a bird in flight, and Migiwa Orimo’s old-style telephone booth that beckons villagers to come inside and create their own experimental artworks.

  • Sunday liquor sales sought

    There is a small movement afoot to allow Sunday liquor sales and consumption in the downtown business district, which could significantly affect village restaurants and also local nonprofit organizations. The local option issue is one for the November ballot that needs approval from a majority of registered voters in the village to allow businesses in the downtown precinct to sell liquor on Sundays.

  • Iran turmoil hits home for some

    Villagers with family and friends in Iran have been watching the recent turmoil in that country closely. Among them are, shown above from left, new village resident Farideh Tahririha, holding her great-nephew Sameer Sajabi; Nacim Sajabi, who was raised in Yellow Springs, with her son, Mateen; and Mahshad Tahririha and her aunt, Farzaneh Mader, Nacim’s mother.

    When Nacim Sajabi had her first child several years ago, she surprised herself by speaking to her baby in Farsi, the language of Iran, her mother’s homeland. While Sajabi’s mother, Farzaneh Mader, and her aunts and grandmother had spoken Farsi to Sajabi as she grew up in Yellow Springs, she most often responded in English. But the birth of her firstborn seemed to spark inside her some deep connection with the language she didn’t even know she had.

Weather forecast by WP Wunderground & Denver Snow Plowing