Village Life Section :: Page 75

  • Gardens yield more than green

    Some members of the loosely-networked community gardening group are shown in the FCC garden. Pictured from left to right are: standing, back row: Meranda Pelzl, Corinne Pelzl, Daniel L. Pelzl, Rob Content and Doug ‘Thor’ Bailey. Middle row, seated: Faith Morgan, Eric Johnson, Jenny Haack, Max Banaszak-Moore, Bob Moore. Front row: McKenna Banaszak-Moore and Christine O. Roberts, Sally Palmer and Paul Webb.

    Some say starting a garden is an act of faith, a passive act done best when the moon is right. Others, like a new local community gardening group, plan for a good crop by building beds of e-mail list serves and germinating ideas at community potlucks.

    This loosely networked bunch of area gardening enthusiasts and hopeful amateurs has scattered seeds of intention across the village and Miami Township that just might sprout up in the form of shared gardens, seed swaps and educational activities near you.

  • Little folk dancing

    Yelping and hooting to the beat of their dancing feet this week, Mills Lawn students were helpless to resist the call to folkdance with workshop leaders Cristian Florescu and Sonia Dion, who visited the school on Friday and Monday, March 27 and 30. Professional folk dance teachers and performers from Montreal, Florescu and Dion used traditional choreography and cultural concepts of Romania, Quebec, Israel, Dominican Republic and Bolivia to foster the discovery of dance as a mode of self expression and to open the students to a global vision. Their residency was made possible by a grant from the Dayton Foundation, sponsored by Leslie Hyll and Edmund Cordray, of the Miami Valley Folk Dancers.  Above, clockwise from top, Florescu led a warm up to a delighted bunch of second and third graders, just before Nathan Davis and Kennedy Young participated in a snaking line dance to the sound of a French Canadian Farandole.

    These News photos are available Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Dancing near the streets Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’ Fall of the sprawl Strangers — and friends — […]

  • Springfield man robs US Bank

    Due largely to the testimony of a village resident and information from a security tape, on Tuesday, March 31, Yellow Springs police arrested a Springfield man who confessed to having robbed US Bank last week.

  • Way opening for family in YS

    The Gravley-Novellos left the frenetic pace of the Washington, D.C. area and moved to Yellow Springs in July 2008. From left are: Tony, Lori and Connor with their dogs Cody, Olive and Maggie.

    Four years ago, Tony Novello was a visitor to Ohio, en route to a golf tournament with a colleague from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. While his friend drove, the Maryland resident took in the sights.

  • First fling of spring

    Michael Kalter, left, and Doug Hamilton performed a lively acoustic set of rock and roll, bluegrass and Eastern European music to the delight of dancing patrons at the Emporium’s Underdog Café on Friday, March 20. The musicians performed with their Miami Valley-based band, Wildwater Band, as part of the Spring into the Arts weekend, which was organized by members of the Yellow Springs Arts Council.

    These News photos are available Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: ‘Red Pants’ dance Dancing near the streets Little folk dancing Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’ Fall of the […]

  • New rules to help regulate farmer’s market

    In an effort to better organize and provide security for the Yellow Springs Farmer’s Market in Kings Yard, this year market organizers have for the first time created a set of guidelines for vendors. Among the new rules are that vendors must apply for and pay for a space, they must have liability insurance, and they are limited to selling items that were either grown or made in their home county.

  • Women voice triumphs, traumas, common struggles — out loud

    Liz Hale, left, will read an excerpt of a piece written by Gladys Wessels, longtime women’s rights activist, former professor at Wright State University and early member of Women, Inc., at the Women’s Voices Out Loud event on Saturday, March 28. Wessels cannot attend the event in person due to her health.

    One woman speaks of her individual experience of growing up in the late 1920s. And as she voices her testimonial, other women recognize in her story, a shared struggle to be heard and to be empowered.

  • Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’

    Dancers recently rehearsed “Too Much Fun,” a piece that was choreographed by Yellow Springs residents Ali Thomas and Lara Bauer, for the Valerie Blackwell-Truitt Community Dance Concert. According to Thomas, the piece is about, “a bench, teens, townies and peace officers.” The dance concert, which will showcase eleven original works, will be held on Friday, March 20, and Saturday, March 21, at 8 p.m. at the Mills Lawn Elementary School auditorium. Clockwise from bottom left are Crystal Reedy, Amelia Tarpey, Dylan Sage, Rick Walkey, Charlotte Walkey, Lara Bauer, Jade Turner, Jason Sine, Andrea Hutson, Keri Speck, Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, Jennifer Johnson and Ali Thomas.

    These News photos are available Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Little folk dancing Hey! Let’s put on a show! Fall of the sprawl Strangers — and friends […]

  • Arts Council springs ahead

    With the first toll of spring, the village will be transformed into an organized arts and culture hop as the Yellow Springs Arts Council jump-starts another year of seasonal programming.

  • Large YS employers holding steady

    While the turbulent economic climate has affected all regions of the country, some municipalities are faring better than others. So far, Yellow Springs seems to be one of the relatively fortunate towns, as most of the largest employers in Yellow Springs report overall stability, even as they face the coming year with caution.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground