Village Life Section :: Page 75

  • Baptist tea hits 50 with thanks

    In gratitude to the community for its support over the past 50 years, the First Baptist Church will celebrate the golden anniversary of its calendar tea event, which is now called the First Baptist Annual Tea, on Sunday, April 26, from 3 to 6 p.m. In this News photo from 1992, Jocelyn Robinson, Ernestine Lucas and Ruth Wright, holding Birch Robinson-Hubbuch, attended a tea at Yellow Springs High School.

    Some traditions don’t change, such as the raisin bars, spinach balls and heavenly tea cakes with orange glaze that Isabel Newman makes every year for the event known as the First Baptist Church Calendar Tea. But other traditions do, such as the fact that the Calendar Tea, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this Sunday, April 26, 3–6 p.m., is no longer named after its 12 tables themed for each month of the year.

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • That’s some long hare

    Patrick (aka “Brother Bear”) and Mindy Harney recently sat with their children, from left, Gracie, Elesha, Sophie and Molly on the steps outside Brother Bear’s Café, 118 Dayton Street. The café will be celebrating its grand opening Friday–Monday, April 17–20.

    RELATED POSTS: Which came first, the bunny or the egg?

  • Green Fair touts Earth care

    “We’re trying to change our lives,” event organizer Rob Content said in a recent interview. He looked at Jorie Sieck, a youth organizer, and added, “as grownups, this is a challenge.” Content thinks that events like the Earth Day Fair bring people together, and that working together is what makes personal change possible.

    Living Green co-owner C.J. Williams defines “green” as anything with a focus on sustainability that is good for the Earth and good for individuals. More than 20 tables representing green individuals, green businesses and green non-profits are confirmed for the day, she said.

  • Brother Bear brews cup of kindness

    Patrick (aka “Brother Bear”) and Mindy Harney recently sat with their children, from left, Gracie, Elesha, Sophie and Molly on the steps outside Brother Bear’s Café, 118 Dayton Street. The café will be celebrating its grand opening Friday–Monday, April 17–20.

    “Last call on espresso bar!” That’s what patrons will typically hear just before closing time at Brother Bear’s Café, the new coffeehouse located at 118 Dayton Street (formerly the site of the Epic Book Shop). To know how the coffeehouse came to be (and how it almost never was) adds a unique cocoa-mocha twist to […]

  • Board, not bored

    On a recent spring afternoon local skate park enthusiasts showed off their moves. Pictured are, from left, Cole Honeycutt of Yellow Springs, Xenia resident Jason Francis and Hayden Franz. A conversation on skate park issues, bringing together young people, local police and Village management, will take place soon, organized by the Village Human Relations Commission. An article on recent skate park concerns is on page 8 in this week's issue.

    These News photos are available Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Hey! Let’s put on a show! Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’ Third time’s no charm Strangers — and […]

  • Small businesses weather economy

    The health of the local economy is tied not only to the village’s largest employers, but also to the many smaller ones that together contribute substantially to Village coffers. With the many entrepreneurs educated at Antioch College, Yellow Springs has a rich legacy of fostering start-ups, and that small-business diversity is a critical part of the stability of the local economy, according to Village Manager Mark Cundiff.

  • Gardens yield more than green

    Some members of the loosely-networked community gardening group are shown in the FCC garden. Pictured from left to right are: standing, back row: Meranda Pelzl, Corinne Pelzl, Daniel L. Pelzl, Rob Content and Doug ‘Thor’ Bailey. Middle row, seated: Faith Morgan, Eric Johnson, Jenny Haack, Max Banaszak-Moore, Bob Moore. Front row: McKenna Banaszak-Moore and Christine O. Roberts, Sally Palmer and Paul Webb.

    Some say starting a garden is an act of faith, a passive act done best when the moon is right. Others, like a new local community gardening group, plan for a good crop by building beds of e-mail list serves and germinating ideas at community potlucks.

    This loosely networked bunch of area gardening enthusiasts and hopeful amateurs has scattered seeds of intention across the village and Miami Township that just might sprout up in the form of shared gardens, seed swaps and educational activities near you.

  • Little folk dancing

    Yelping and hooting to the beat of their dancing feet this week, Mills Lawn students were helpless to resist the call to folkdance with workshop leaders Cristian Florescu and Sonia Dion, who visited the school on Friday and Monday, March 27 and 30. Professional folk dance teachers and performers from Montreal, Florescu and Dion used traditional choreography and cultural concepts of Romania, Quebec, Israel, Dominican Republic and Bolivia to foster the discovery of dance as a mode of self expression and to open the students to a global vision. Their residency was made possible by a grant from the Dayton Foundation, sponsored by Leslie Hyll and Edmund Cordray, of the Miami Valley Folk Dancers.  Above, clockwise from top, Florescu led a warm up to a delighted bunch of second and third graders, just before Nathan Davis and Kennedy Young participated in a snaking line dance to the sound of a French Canadian Farandole.

    These News photos are available Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Dancing near the streets Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’ Fall of the sprawl Strangers — and friends — […]

  • Springfield man robs US Bank

    Due largely to the testimony of a village resident and information from a security tape, on Tuesday, March 31, Yellow Springs police arrested a Springfield man who confessed to having robbed US Bank last week.

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