Village Life Section :: Page 80

  • On Halloween, Gardner puts the ‘boo’ back into books

    Lucille Gardner shares a book with 7-year-old Sean Adams. She continues to share her passion for reading with children in novel ways, including inviting trick-or-treaters in for a snack and a book.

    “She may be hard of hearing but she listens to kids,” said Sue Hawkey of her friend and colleague, Lucille Gardner. “She really hears what kids have to say.” Hawkey taught fourth grade at Mills Lawn School from 2003 up until this past spring.

  • School serves up wisdom, skills

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool begins its mission of passing along life skills and wisdom with a ‘folkshop,’ Oct. 17–18, at the Glen Helen Outdoor Education Center. Shown left to right are organizers and contributors, front row, Eric Wolf, Kay Reimers; back row, Carolion, Suzanne Rudolf, Joe Cook.

    The Heart of Joy Folkschool, which has been quietly simmering on a back burner, is ready to be served. “It’s come from a lot of people,” said artist Carolion, one of the initial organizers of the school. “It’s been cooking and bubbling for months.”

  • Fall Street Fair: festing in the fall

    This fall the Yellow Springs Street Fair will be held downtown on Saturday, Oct. 11, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., with the Music Festival and Beer Garden, at the Bryan Community Center, running from noon to 7 p.m.

  • Chamber representatives visit Texas to court BRAC workers

    Karen Wintrow of the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce and Mark Crockett of Community Resources traveled to San Antonio, Texas, last week to meet with Air Force employees who may relocate to the Dayton area through BRAC.

    When Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Karen Wintrow learned that the Dayton Development Coalition, or DDC, was considering a trip to San Antonio, Texas, to try to convince residents whose jobs were being moved to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to move to the region, she decided to get aggressive.

  • For the Schwerners, life after YS, WYSO

    Longtime Yellow Springs resident Steve Schwerner, who has hosted a jazz program on WYSO Public Radio for 50 years, since he was an Antioch College student, will host his last WYSO show Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 8 p.m. Schwerner and his wife, Nancy, will move to Brooklyn soon to be near their children and grandchildren. Schwerner is pictured above in the WYSO studio hosting his program.

    When he was a student at Antioch College, Steve Schwerner was sure to get co-ops that would bring him back to his hometown, New York City, so he could hang out in jazz clubs as much as possible.

  • Wind wallops YS; villagers rally in aftermath

    Big winds from Hurricane Ike slammed into Yellow Springs on Sunday, leaving uprooted trees, such as one that landed on the Walnut Street home of Chris and Cindy Mucher.

    Shortly after the lights came on in downtown Yellow Springs Tuesday noon, Mark DeLozier, sitting at the piano that had been dragged from inside the Emporium out to the sidewalk, launched into “On the Sunny Side of the Street.”

  • Mitzi Manny, a heart lifted by music

    A community potluck on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 4 to 7 p.m. will honor Mitzi Manny, who will celebrate her 90th birthday. The event will take place at the Senior Center great room.

    Mitzi Manny swipes her 15-pound accordion out of its tattered case as though it were a ragdoll and slips her arms through the straps like an old friend. She sways just slightly as the squeeze box sings out “When I Grow Too Old to Dream,” and the two look fit to be together.

  • Dealing with the storm aftermath

    Due to the unusually high volume of tree damage caused by Sunday’s high winds, the Village of Yellow Springs has expanded its efforts to collect branches and limbs in local neighborhoods.

  • YSI contaminants still linger

    Several vigilant groups of environmentalists received satisfactory news last week when they met with the team leading the bioremediation of contaminants spilled at the YSI campus on Brannum Lane in the early 1990s.

  • Women’s Threshold Choir sings for healing and for pleasure

    Local Threshold Choir members, from left, Teresa Sapunar, Sylvia Carter Denny, Paulette Olson and Mary Donahoe sing to each other when they rehearse.

    Their voices floated in with soothing softness and a power to calm the rumbles of anxiety. Sylvia sang as close as a mother to her baby, while Mary cooed her part and Theresa led the choral rounds from an arm’s length away.

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