Religion & Spirituality Section :: Page 4

  • Presbyterians throw birthday bash for community

    This photo, taken in the late 1800s, shows the 150-year-old santuary of the First Presbyterian Church as viewed from Walnut Street. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Yellow Springs First Presbyterian Church is throwing a 150th birthday party for the community that supported it through its long history on Friday, Sept. 3 from 7 p.m. to 9 on the church’s front lawn.

  • Presbyterians celebrate 150th

    The Yellow Springs Presbyterian Church will celebrate its 150-year birthday on Friday, Sept. 3, from 7 to 9 p.m. on the church’s front lawn downtown. Church members, including above, from left, Jeanna Breza, Barbara Boettcher, Ruth Bent and Lloyd Kennedy, invite the public to attend the party for free cake, ice cream and lemonade.

    In 1855 the First Presbyterian Church was founded in Yellow Springs when Nancy Love, tired of going by horseback in bad weather to churches in Clifton and other nearby towns, successfully convinced her husband Robert to start, with other locals, a Presbyterian church here in town. Five years later, the members, for $5,000, built the church that still stands on Xenia Avenue today.

  • A new leader for Methodists

    Yellow Springs native Sherri Blackwell, the new pastor at the United Methodist Church, gives her first sermon on Sunday, June 6, at 10:30 a.m. Blackwell plans to lead the church with a focus on “faith in action.” (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In the last eight years the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church has transformed from a small, aging congregation to an active and renewed church under the leadership of Pastor Charles Hill. As the 76-year-old Hill retires, the church looks to a new pastor, Yellow Springs native Sherri Blackwell, to build on his accomplishments.

  • Pastor Hill’s Final Sermon

    Pastor Charles Hill walks to the pulpit on Sunday morning to give his final sermon at the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Eight years ago, Pastor Charles Hill came out of retirement to serve at the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church. Today, he gave his final sermon at the church and in his 52-year career as a pastor.

  • At Friends Community, sweet care and bittersweet holidays

    While Friends Care Community employees work hard all year long, they put in extra effort over the holidays, according to longtime restoration aide Kent Little, who has worked in the local nursing home for 23 years.

    “Employees try hard to make it a good Christmas for residents,” he said this week. “They take pride in what they do.”

  • Carol of the bells

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Yellow Springs United Methodist Church Celebrates 175 Years Presbyterians throw birthday bash for community

  • Presbies welcome new pastor

    Growing up in the farming community of Arcanum, Ohio, almost five decades ago, Doris Arnett Whitaker was surrounded by strong, church-going women who passed on to her their highest aspirations for a young girl: if she worked hard, she could grow up to be a nurse, a teacher, or a minister’s wife.

    Whitaker took that advice seriously, although she’s given it a significant twist. She’s not the minister’s wife. She’s the minister.

  • Antioch Buddhist program is 30

    The Antioch Education Abroad Buddhist Studies program celebrates its 30th anniversary this weekend with a reunion of students and faculty. Shown above are, from left, Sayadaw U Nyaneinda, abbot of the monastery in Bodh Gaya, India, which provides housing for AEA students; Robert Pryor, program director since the program’s beginning; Dianeah Wanicek; Sister Dharmavijaya and Sister Molini, also of Bodh Gaya. The public is invited to a screening of Amongst White Clouds at the Little Art on Sunday, May 24, 3 p.m.

    The Buddhist Studies Program of Antioch Education Abroad, or AEA, offers something unique to young people, organizers believe. The young participants not only study Buddhism but live it, immersed in an exotic world as residents of a monastery among monks and nuns.

  • Baptist tea hits 50 with thanks

    In gratitude to the community for its support over the past 50 years, the First Baptist Church will celebrate the golden anniversary of its calendar tea event, which is now called the First Baptist Annual Tea, on Sunday, April 26, from 3 to 6 p.m. In this News photo from 1992, Jocelyn Robinson, Ernestine Lucas and Ruth Wright, holding Birch Robinson-Hubbuch, attended a tea at Yellow Springs High School.

    Some traditions don’t change, such as the raisin bars, spinach balls and heavenly tea cakes with orange glaze that Isabel Newman makes every year for the event known as the First Baptist Church Calendar Tea. But other traditions do, such as the fact that the Calendar Tea, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this Sunday, April 26, 3–6 p.m., is no longer named after its 12 tables themed for each month of the year.

  • Building expenses spark Presbyterian finance woes

    The Emporium was lit up on Saturday night with the music and enthusiasm of over 100 congregants and supporters of the Yellow Springs First Presbyterian Church, who were partying at a fund-raising benefit.

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