2021 Yellow Springs News Merchandise
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20
2021

Articles From August 30th, 2019

  • Mel Fine

    Melvin Herbert Fine, 70, of Kettering, died Wednesday, Oct. 14, at Hospice of Dayton. He lived in Yellow Springs from 1968 to 1998. He was born Feb. 1, 1939, in Newark, N. J., and grew up in Wilmington, Del. Mel graduated from University of Delaware in 1960 with a degree in biology and from Yale […]

  • Bulldog Sports Round-up

    Football team bests Riverview The Bulldog football team’s third-string offense came to the rescue on Friday, Oct. 16, leading to the second win of the season 14–0 against Riverview East Academy. Yellow Springs quarterback Tony Parker came in for injured players and managed a respectable eight passes for 13 attempts to total 139 yards, including […]

  • A nonprofit, Little Art lives on

    Zack McGhee loves the Little Art Theatre. He first started coming here for the indie circuit as a teenager from Fairborn and then in 2006 became a projectionist to get paid for one of his favorite pastimes. He is proud to have brought his Republican parents here to see films such as Michael Moore’s Bowling […]

  • Levy, budget on board plate

    At their Oct. 8 meeting, school board members discussed the updated five-year financial forecast in the light of current economic difficulties.

    District Treasurer Joy Kitzmiller and Interim Superintendent Tony Armocida are recommending that the district seek a levy renewal in May 2010, at the same level as the current levy, which according to Kitzmiller, has remained constant for 10 years.

  • Jobs, land use are forum topics

    The need for collaboration between the Village and various entities, including Miami Township and Antioch College, emerged as a theme during last Sunday’s candidate forum held at the First Presbyterian Church. And while Village Council candidates agreed on the need for job growth, they differed as to how to best pursue that goal.

  • Top library hopes for support

    Call him crazy, but Greene County Public Library Director Karl Colón believes that the library ought to serve the taxpayers who support it. When the people said in a 2005 survey that they wanted more youth programs, better communication and a bigger collection, the Yellow Springs library started console game madness for teens, gussied up its newsletter and Web site and started ordering more books.