Nov
21
2018
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
High 40° / Low 23°
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
High 37° / Low 25°

Articles About Antioch College

  • The Great War that transformed the village

    This 1918 photo shows some of the Antioch College students who joined the Student’s Army Training Corps, a federal program in which male college students were given military training while taking college courses. To be part of the national World War I program, the college had to turn a dormitory into a military barracks. Fifty-four students took part in the training, which included marching around campus in formation. (photo courtesy of Scott Sanders, Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    On Feb. 14, 1919, the Yellow Springs News published a long list on its front page, spanning the entire length of the paper. It was the “Roll of Honor,” a list of all villagers who had served, or were serving, in the Army during the First World War, which had recently ended.

  • A co-op grocery comes to a Dayton food desert

    Lela Klein, who grew up in the village, is the executive director of Co-op Dayton, a nonprofit starting a cooperative grocery store in a food desert in West Dayton. Yellow Springs residents can aid the effort by becoming supporting or voting members, and by attending Co-op Fest Dayton from 5 p.m. to midnight on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Yellow Cab Tavern in Dayton. (Submitted Photo by Steve Bognar)

    On the corner of Salem Avenue and Superior Street in West Dayton sits a vacant building with signs advertising a former artist supply and picture framing shop. By the end of next year, this humble corner will be transformed into a co-operative grocery store.

  • Wright State shuts down Fels study

    An unidentified Fels Longitudinal Study doctor is shown here circa the 1950s examining a young participant. The longest and largest longitudinal health study in the world, the Fels study, for many years based in Yellow Springs, still has more than 1,000 participants in the area, who had yearly appointments beginning in childhood to gather information on body composition. Last month Wright State closed down data collection for the Fels study, which would have turned 90 next year. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    The Fels Longitudinal Study, the world’s longest and largest longitudinal human growth study, has recently come to a close due to actions by Wright State University, which for decades has housed the study.

  • Changemakers

    Nationally known civil rights activist Shaun King headlined a Freedom to Vote Rally on the horseshoe at Antioch College on Sunday, Sept. 23. He spoke to a crowd estimated at 250, sharing suggestions for movement building and social change. (Submitted photo by Elena Dahl)

    Nationally known civil rights activist Shaun King headlined a Freedom to Vote Rally on the horseshoe at Antioch College on Sunday, Sept. 23.

  • Performance, exhibit at Antioch —  Bringing A-bomb history to light

    Noted Japanese composer Keiko Fujiie will present “Wilderness Mute,” a multidisciplinary work of music, image, poetry and Japanese Butoh dance, on Friday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m., in the Foundry Theater at Antioch College. The work is in response to the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki on Aug. 9, 1945, and is slated in conjunction with an exhibit at the Herndon Gallery looking at nuclear bombing archival materials. Fujiie is photographed in the Antioch College president’s house. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    When Japanese atomic-bomb survivor Kyoko Hayashi traveled to the Trinity nuclear test site in New Mexico, she found burned mountains, ruined fields, and a “wilderness forced into silence.”

  • World in the house

    Last Saturday, Sept. 8, the World House Choir gave the second of four performances of ‘Bayard Rustin: The Man Behind the Dream,’ an oratorio that tells the story of a central, yet little-known, figure of the civil rights movement. Composer Steve Milloy was present, along with a standing-room-only crowd at Antioch College’s Foundry Theater. The piece was conducted by Jeremy Winston; narrator and soloists La’Shelle Allen and Keith Dean told the story in word and song. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    Last Saturday, Sept. 8, the World House Choir gave the second of four performances of the oratorio, ‘Bayard Rustin: The Man Behind the Dream.’

  • Antioch College recognized for sustainability practices

    The college’s first crew of four-legged lawnmowers in 2015, shown with Farm Manager Kat Christen and then-student and Farm Assistant Alli King. (YS News file photo)

    Antioch College has been recognized as a top performer in the 2018 Sustainable Campus Index, achieving a second-place rating in top performing institutions for grounds.

  • Emporium art exhibit— Prison portraits focus on humanity

    How does a person keep their will to live when their whole future is in the same place?

  • John Cage’s words inspire dance

    Guest artist Paul Lazar of New York City will visit Antioch College this Friday to put on a solo performance piece, “Cage Shuffle,” in which he recites the stories of experimental artist John Cage along with a movement sequence. The title is so named because Lazar is fed the stories through an ear bud using an iTunes playlist set to shuffle. The performance is Friday, July 20, at 7 p.m. at Antioch’s Foundry Theater. (Submitted photo)

    This week, long-time Yellow Springs resident Louise Smith, associate professor of devised theater and performance at Antioch College, will host a guest artist, Paul Lazar, who will perform “Cage Shuffle,” an original work based on written text by composer John Cage.

  • Plans for investing in the village

    Community economist Michael Shuman brainstormed with Yellow Springs Federal Credit Union Executive Director Sandy Hollenberg after three days of local meetings last week with those representing government, education, business and nonprofit sectors. Shuman and Hollenberg are planning to launch one local investment project here to jumpstart the local economy. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A local debit card with rewards for shopping locally. A business incubator on the Antioch campus. Crowdfunding for local businesses. Student debt refinancing for those who live here after graduation. These ideas and more were explored in a series of conversations last week spearheaded by the Yellow Springs Federal Credit Union, or YSFCU.