Mar
26
2019
Clear
Tuesday
High 47° / Low 25°
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
High 54° / Low 37°

Articles About Antioch College

  • UPDATE — ‘Sound of Music’ rescheduled again for April 11–14

    Auf wiedersehen, Gesundheit! The Sound of Music has been rescheduled once more for April 11–14. Pictured above are members of the cast waving "auf wiedersehen, goodbye" at a rehearsal March 6, shortly before flu and other upper respiratory illnesses laid low many of the performers and their classmates. (Photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Performances of “The Sound of Music,” have been once more rescheduled for April 11–14, so that the play’s cast and crew may recuperate more fully from the sweeping flu outbreak.

  • Abecedary by Mills Lawn first-graders inaugurates Gaunt award

    A is For "AME Church"; from the book, "Wheeling Gaunt’s ABCs"

    For those who don’t know much about the life of Wheeling Gaunt, the Yellow Springs man who bought his own freedom from slavery and for whom Gaunt Park is named, there’s a handy resource out there — and it was written by Mills Lawn’s 2017–18 first-grade class.

  • WYSO to separate from Antioch

    Local radio station 91.3 FM-WYSO will no longer be owned by Antioch College but instead will become an independent nonprofit, according to college and station leaders this week.

  • Food justice the focus of Dayton food & farming conference

    Food justice is the focus of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s 40th annual conference, Feb. 14–16 at the Dayton Convention Center.

  • Al Denman

    Alvin Denman

    Al Denman died Wednesday morning, Jan. 16, 2019. He was 91.

  • Encore Fellows spark collaboration

    The Yellow Springs Community Foundation recently launched the Encore Miller Fellowship, through which local retirees and “late-career” villagers mentor Antioch College Miller Fellows and support collaboration among local nonprofits. Jeannamarie Cox, executive director of the Community Foundation (center), met recently with the first group of Encore Fellows, at left, Jalyn Roe and Kat Walter, and, to her right, Melissa Heston and Len Kramer. Not pictured is Scott Geisel. (Submitted photo)

    When Nolan and Dick Miller bequeathed $3.6 million to the Yellow Springs Community Foundation, they wanted the funds to go to Antioch College students who would serve the local community. Now, the Millers’ intentions are being revisited in a planned expansion of the program.

  • The Great War that transformed the village

    This 1918 photo shows some of the Antioch College students who joined the Student’s Army Training Corps, a federal program in which male college students were given military training while taking college courses. To be part of the national World War I program, the college had to turn a dormitory into a military barracks. Fifty-four students took part in the training, which included marching around campus in formation. (photo courtesy of Scott Sanders, Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    On Feb. 14, 1919, the Yellow Springs News published a long list on its front page, spanning the entire length of the paper. It was the “Roll of Honor,” a list of all villagers who had served, or were serving, in the Army during the First World War, which had recently ended.

  • A co-op grocery comes to a Dayton food desert

    Lela Klein, who grew up in the village, is the executive director of Co-op Dayton, a nonprofit starting a cooperative grocery store in a food desert in West Dayton. Yellow Springs residents can aid the effort by becoming supporting or voting members, and by attending Co-op Fest Dayton from 5 p.m. to midnight on Friday, Oct. 19, at the Yellow Cab Tavern in Dayton. (Submitted Photo by Steve Bognar)

    On the corner of Salem Avenue and Superior Street in West Dayton sits a vacant building with signs advertising a former artist supply and picture framing shop. By the end of next year, this humble corner will be transformed into a co-operative grocery store.

  • Wright State shuts down Fels study

    An unidentified Fels Longitudinal Study doctor is shown here circa the 1950s examining a young participant. The longest and largest longitudinal health study in the world, the Fels study, for many years based in Yellow Springs, still has more than 1,000 participants in the area, who had yearly appointments beginning in childhood to gather information on body composition. Last month Wright State closed down data collection for the Fels study, which would have turned 90 next year. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    The Fels Longitudinal Study, the world’s longest and largest longitudinal human growth study, has recently come to a close due to actions by Wright State University, which for decades has housed the study.

  • Changemakers

    Nationally known civil rights activist Shaun King headlined a Freedom to Vote Rally on the horseshoe at Antioch College on Sunday, Sept. 23. He spoke to a crowd estimated at 250, sharing suggestions for movement building and social change. (Submitted photo by Elena Dahl)

    Nationally known civil rights activist Shaun King headlined a Freedom to Vote Rally on the horseshoe at Antioch College on Sunday, Sept. 23.