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Jun
27
2022

Articles About poetry

  • Emergent Verse | Bending time, form, convention

    Banner for column "Emergent Verse" by Ed Davis

    As intricately executed as Ravndal’s use of the villanelle form is, it was actually tone that first attracted me.

  • Emergent Verse | The quiet work of the heart

    Banner for column "Emergent Verse" by Ed Davis

    “With ‘Concert for my Mother,’ Larry Hussman transitions from writing primarily nature poetry into the realm of confessional verse. The result is a deeply affecting and well-crafted narrative poem.”

  • Emergent Verse | Sonorous Sibilants

    Banner for column "Emergent Verse" by Ed Davis

    “Poets love form — even free-versers like me, who let go of strictly prescribed numbers of syllables in each line (meter), number of lines (like sonnets, villanelles) and rhyme schemes.”

  • Emergent Verse | ‘High Lonesome’

    Banner for column "Emergent Verse" by Ed Davis

    Retired Antioch professor, poet and translator Harold Wright used to contribute articles to the News, concluding with a tanka, a strict Japanese poetic form.

  • Emergent Verse | An Introduction

    Banner for column "Emergent Verse" by Ed Davis

    As I walked in Glen Helen pondering the first installment of this reincarnated poetry column, the phrase “emergent verse” came to me and I realized I’d found its title.

  • Review— Queer poems as Midwest field guide

    Sometimes pastoral, sometimes confessional, “evening primroses” roots out what it means to move through a changing landscape as a changing self.

  • First Lines — Many human hearts

    “Completing the harvest” of two years of poetry columns in the News, a final column of thanks to poets and readers. Eighteen local and regional poets have appeared in this space.

  • Winter Solstice Poetry Reading— ‘Magics and songs’ offer healing gifts

    The season’s first snowfall came ahead of Tecumseh Land Trust’s annual Winter Solstice Poetry Reading, to be held this year on Friday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., via Zoom.

  • First Lines — What remains

    In the July column, a delicate and image-rich poem by Delaware, Ohio, poet Kip Knott. What is our place in the world? Can the question be transcended, or better — simply let go?

  • First Lines — Heart of compassion

    Amid the turmoil on Earth, have you looked at the stars? Villager Tim Morand contributes this month’s poem, a meditation on compassion, the shifts in human life and the grandeur of the night sky.

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