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Apr
04
2020

Articles About poetry

  • First Lines — ‘And the heart calls me …’

    Who am I, really? A contemplative poem by villager Khara Scott-Bey explores self-definition to the edges of identity, and beyond.

  • First Lines — JOY JOY JOY

    A poem from a former villager, the late Jean Barlow Hudson. Strange, dreamlike, filled with somberness and joy, Jean’s poem helps us welcome the turning of the year.

  • First Lines — Poetry of the sleeping breath

    Eternity sleeps. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    The voice of the dog. Simple, straightforward. And then, like a child who speaks an uncanny truth, soulful. Two “poems for dogs” from villager Artie Isaac.

  • First Lines — October, catching fire

    Not all poems marvel or praise. Some embrace the bleakness — as this month’s poem by MJ White does, beautifully.

  • First Lines — A wisdom poem

    “There is an impassable gap ….” A poem from villager Jim Malarkey contemplates our strangeness to each other. Intimacy as well as violence grows in that “gap.”

  • First Lines — ‘While tottering …’

    In this month’s poem, villager Janeal Turnbull Ravndal meditates on marriage, aging and the loss of balance, leading to new forms of grace.

  • First Lines — The world of objects

    What do objects want? This month’s poem by Reilly Dixon enters the world of objects.

  • First Lines — Of memory, hiding and identity

    What happens to those who came before us also happens to us. In a poem by villager Maxine Skuba, world history and personal history touch hands.

  • First Lines — The magic of small forms

    This month’s poems come from longtime villager Rubin Battino, who has been writing three-line poems for decades. “We hit it off,” he said of the short form, his own adaptation of haiku.

  • Together, local poets refine their verses

    A group of five poets meet regularly in the village to share and critique each other’s work using a unique method developed in nearby Greenville. From left to right are Fran Simon, Anne Randolph and Joan Harris of the group. Not pictured are Maxine Skuba and Annette Oxindine. (Photo by Carla Steiger)

    A group of five poets have met monthly on Sunday evenings in their homes for the last two years, to help each other improve their poetry skills.