Dec
06
2019
Yellow Springs
47°
overcast clouds
humidity: 66%
wind: 15mph WSW
H 45 • L 44

Articles About poetry

  • First Lines — October, catching fire

    Not all poems marvel or praise. Some embrace the bleakness — as this month’s poem by MJ White does, beautifully.

  • First Lines — A wisdom poem

    “There is an impassable gap ….” A poem from villager Jim Malarkey contemplates our strangeness to each other. Intimacy as well as violence grows in that “gap.”

  • First Lines — ‘While tottering …’

    In this month’s poem, villager Janeal Turnbull Ravndal meditates on marriage, aging and the loss of balance, leading to new forms of grace.

  • First Lines — The world of objects

    What do objects want? This month’s poem by Reilly Dixon enters the world of objects.

  • First Lines — Of memory, hiding and identity

    What happens to those who came before us also happens to us. In a poem by villager Maxine Skuba, world history and personal history touch hands.

  • First Lines — The magic of small forms

    This month’s poems come from longtime villager Rubin Battino, who has been writing three-line poems for decades. “We hit it off,” he said of the short form, his own adaptation of haiku.

  • Together, local poets refine their verses

    A group of five poets meet regularly in the village to share and critique each other’s work using a unique method developed in nearby Greenville. From left to right are Fran Simon, Anne Randolph and Joan Harris of the group. Not pictured are Maxine Skuba and Annette Oxindine. (Photo by Carla Steiger)

    A group of five poets have met monthly on Sunday evenings in their homes for the last two years, to help each other improve their poetry skills.

  • Finding room to write, and grow in Yellow Springs

    Poets Christopher DeWeese and Heather Christle moved to the village in 2013 after DeWeese accepted a teaching job at Wright State. Here, they play with their daughter, Harriet, who was born in Yellow Springs in 2014 and is already a regular at the Emporium, Sunrise Café and the public library. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    WHY YS? This is the fourth article in an occasional series looking at why people choose to live in Yellow Springs.