2020 Holiday Giving and Gifting Catalogue
2020 Holiday Giving and Gifting Catalogue
Dec
03
2020

Articles About Black Lives Matter

  • Banner up

    On Friday, Sept. 4, a new Black Lives Matter banner was raised across U.S. 68 on the north end of the village.

  • Council recommits to anti-racism

    At their Aug. 17 virtual meeting, Village Council members agreed to move forward to meet the demands of local anti-racist rally organizers and take other steps to address racism locally after tensions escalated between the two groups in recent weeks.

  • Street scene

    Local anti-racist activists took to the streets for the 12th consecutive weekend, expressing themselves with chants such as “Black lives matter,” “Black is beautiful,” and “No justice, no peace.”

  • Demonstrators, Village at odds

    Discussions between a group of anti-racist demonstrators and Village officials broke down this week after a letter from two Council members was met with a swift rebuke from organizers.

  • Village Council— Anti-racist steps demanded

    Organizers of recent weekly anti-racism rallies downtown aired criticism at Council’s July 20 virtual meeting of Village efforts to address racism.

  • Remembering Phyllis Jackson

    Yellow Springs resident Phyllis Jackson, 95, died on July 11 after a long and rich life of service to the community she loved. A memorial service was held for Jackson on Saturday, July 18, at Central Chapel AME Church, where she’d been a member since 1943.

  • Black women amplified

    “Empowering Black Women” was the theme of the most recent anti-racism rally, held Saturday, July 11, near the Yellow Springs Public Library, and followed by a march. Here, artist Abby Flanagan stood by some of her original artwork. (Photo by Kathleen Galarza)

    “Empowering Black Women” was the theme of the most recent anti-racism rally, held Saturday, July 11.

  • Parade canceled after alleged KKK protest threat

    Nerak Roth Patterson parades his red convertible through downtown at 2018's Fourth of July parade (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    All the organizers interviewed this week also said the decision was influenced by the voicemail from a man purporting to be affiliated with the KKK, a notorious hate group with a long history of violence against Black people.

  • Women’s March co-founder Tamika Mallory— Struggle against racism continues

    Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women’s March, stands in front of a projected photograph of Coretta Scott King, Antioch alumna. Mallory gave a talk at Antioch College on April 26, the day after she received the second annual Coretta Scott King Legacy Award. She told the audience that the struggle for civil rights continues and that fighting systemic racism is everyone’s responsibility. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Evoking the words of the late Coretta Scott King, Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women’s March, in town to accept an award in the Antioch College graduate’s name, told an audience that fighting systemic racism is everyone’s obligation. 

  • Taking the knee, together

    Protesters at Saturday’s action took a knee and sang the national anthem while kneeling on one knee, a gesture of solidarity with NFL players who have done the same during the anthem. Pictured here, from left, are villagers Kelly Fox, Tina Fox, Dan Dixon, Maria Bakari, Sherry Walker and Aiysha Walker. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    At least 65 local protesters “took the knee” for racial justice last Saturday.