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Jan
21
2022

Articles About Tecumseh Land Trust

  • Down to Earth — Tecumseh Land Trust and affordable housing

    “Affordable housing, farmland preservation and native habitat conservation — are they mutually exclusive?”

  • Tecumseh Land Trust sees leadership change

    What might have been a major transition for many organizations was less earth-shaking for Tecumseh Land Trust, or TLT, when the nonprofit’s longtime executive director retired this fall.

  • Ten years of Winter Solstice Poetry Readings

    Now in its 10th year, the Winter Solstice Poetry Reading’s theme is “Sacred Ground,” which, according to organizer and local poet Ed Davis, is an homage to the event’s longtime and rightful home: Glen Helen.

  • Winter Solstice Poetry Reading— ‘Magics and songs’ offer healing gifts

    The season’s first snowfall came ahead of Tecumseh Land Trust’s annual Winter Solstice Poetry Reading, to be held this year on Friday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m., via Zoom.

  • Sugar Shack tour returns

    John DeWine of Flying Mouse Farms is busy these days boiling down hundreds of gallons of sap from some 650 taps of the farm’s maple trees to make maple syrup. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Tecumseh Land Trust will hold its annual sugar shack tour on Sunday, March 1, 2–4 p.m. at Whitehall Farm.

  • Sunflower field to receive VIDA award

    The Village of Yellow Springs Arts and Culture Commission will present the Village Inspiration & Design Award, or VIDA, to Dave and Sharen Neuhardt for the sunflower field, which they first planted in 2002.

  • Good green, bad green

    Not all green is “green.” That’s the message from local land managers who are combating a host of non-native invasive plant species that menace locally preserved and reclaimed lands. 

  • Growing local—Coming home to their cows

    Scott and Jillian Marshall are in their seventh year of raising beef cattle at their West Jackson Road farm a few miles northeast of the village. The local farmers — who still have their day jobs — love caring for the cows, teaching their children about the cycle of life and serving customers with antibiotic-free, mostly grass-fed beef. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Although agriculture is Ohio’s No. 1 industry, most of what is grown in the state is not consumed here.

  • Local agriculture conference — A growing green movement

    Soil scientist Bob Hendershot taught a session during a land assessment workshop held at the Agraria Center for Regenerative Agriculture last summer. Hendershot, whose career was with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, will return for a local farming conference organized by the Tecumseh Land Trust and Community Solutions on March 15–17. A free talk by farmer Renee Winner on how to transition to organic agriculture will kick off the event at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 15. (Submitted photo by Amy Harper)

    Unless new farming practices are adopted, the world has only 60 years of harvests left, the United Nations announced a few years ago. 

  • Food justice the focus of Dayton food & farming conference

    Food justice is the focus of the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s 40th annual conference, Feb. 14–16 at the Dayton Convention Center.

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