Oct
17
2018
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Articles About environmental sustainability

  • Company turns trash into treasure

    Matthew Lawson sees a treasure trove of biodiversity in rotting organic waste. His company, Trillium Organic Services, will soon offer curbside composting in the Village. (Submitted Photo )

    Matthew Lawson is passionate about compost. Where some see stinky, rotting waste, Lawson sees a renewable resource. What is worthless trash to some is, to him, a rich biodiversity.

  • Antioch College recognized for sustainability practices

    The college’s first crew of four-legged lawnmowers in 2015, shown with Farm Manager Kat Christen and then-student and Farm Assistant Alli King. (YS News file photo)

    Antioch College has been recognized as a top performer in the 2018 Sustainable Campus Index, achieving a second-place rating in top performing institutions for grounds.

  • Grounding vision of resilience at Agraria

    Community Solutions Executive Director Susan Jennings looked out at the Agraria farm from the renovated barn at the 128-acre property just west of the village. Community Solutions’ annual meeting will be at Agraria on Saturday, July 21, from 2 to 4 p.m. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    On the property Community Solutions purchased last year, the 75-year-old local nonprofit wants to model regenerative agriculture as part of its mission to create resilient communities in the face of climate change.

  • Operation Bluebird — YS students monitor nesting boxes

    Operation Bluebird, a collaboration between Yellow Springs Schools and Tecumseh Land Trust that puts McKinney Middle School seventh-graders in the role of “Citizen Scientists” to monitor the activity at local nesting boxes, will resume this spring with a new crop of students. Pictured from last year, from left, are Aamil Wagner, Joaquin Espinosa and Jonathan Garrett. (Submitted photo)

    There’s nothing quite like seeing a bluebird in its environment, especially for bird lovers.

  • Seeking ways to keep bees buzzing

    Nadia Malarkey is relaunching the Yellow Springs Pollinator Regeneration Project with a free talk on Wednesday, Feb. 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Antioch University Midwest main auditorium. Malarkey, a landscape designer, will teach homeowners how to address the plight of pollinators with eco-friendly landscaping practices. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The plight of the bumblebee is never far from Nadia Malarkey’s mind, whether  gardening at her West Whiteman Street home, designing properties around town for her landscaping business, or researching pesticide-free lawn care strategies for the Village of Yellow Springs as part of the Environmental Commission.

  • Community Solutions — Agraria vision takes root

    Locally based poet Ed Davis read some of his work during a community dinner in August to celebrate Community Solutions’ Agraria project. The dinner, featuring locally sourced foods, was held in the property’s 7,000-square-foot barn. (Submitted Photo)

    More than six months after the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions signed the necessary papers to purchase its new 128-acre property on the western edge of the village, a comprehensive vision for the land is solidifying.

  • Fixing up ‘stuff,’ building bonds

    Deborah Dillon brought her “chirping” 46-year-old clock radio to last Saturday’s Repair Café, a free event for repairing household items such as clothing, furniture, lamps, computers and other small electronics. Duard Headley, also pictured, was one of the volunteer “fixers.” The Repair Café was organized by Kat Walter of YS Time Exchange. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Twenty-five people brought items ranging from laptops to old slippers to electric boot driers to the recent Repair Café at the Bryan Center, organized by the Yellow Springs Time Exchange. There were nine volunteer “fixers” on hand to help.

  • Sale puts farmland at risk

    The 267-acre Arnovitz property is slated to go to auction March 16 in nine parcels. (YS News map)

    At Village Council’s Feb. 21 meeting, a villager and Village Council member urged villagers to come together in an effort to preserve farmland at risk of development on the western edge of Yellow Springs.

  • Local food activists strategize, plan for a commercial kitchen

    Last fall about 50 people toured the High Street garden of Al Schlueter, shown above gesturing during the tour. A second tour of Schlueter’s garden, along with those of Macy Reynolds and the Antioch Farm, takes place this Sunday, Aug. 14, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot behind the Wellness Center. (Submitted photo)

    A growing interest among villagers around local food has led to an ambitious effort to make the village a regional food hub, with an initial step of creating a commercial kitchen as the first component of a community economic incubator.

  • Plan, curtail for climate goals

    Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy outside their new nonprofit, Plan Curtail, located on East Whiteman Street. Through its website at www.plancurtail.org, the organization provides research, perspectives, metrics and methods to individuals seeking to make meaningful lifestyle changes to lower their carbon dioxide emissions. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Villagers Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy believe planning a personal energy budget and curtailing personal energy use are the essential actions individuals can take to help slow global warming.