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Oct
23
2021

Editorial Section

  • The Briar Patch — The architecture of community

    “Sometimes it’s good to be reminded that dwellings have meaning beyond an individual’s portfolio investment and can be designed in such a way as to protect people, transform and shift functions beyond a shelf life of 50 or 60 years.”

  • The Briar Patch— Zoning battles, a Mother’s Day story

    It is in the spirit of these Black mothers I say Happy Mother’s Day. Keep fighting the good fight for social justice and change.

  • The Briar Patch— Care for the caregivers

    Caregiving is an extended lesson in patience that lives well beyond the moment — and in many ways is the ultimate life lesson in companionship combined with perseverance.

  • The Briar Patch— Life cycles of community

    Yellow Springers will soon be asked to support efforts to either build a new school or improve the structures that are already in place through a new school levy. Up until three years ago, a school levy passing in Yellow Springs had been a no-brainer for several generations.

  • EDITORIAL — ‘No’ to 500 county jail beds

    The Greene County Jail on East Market Street in downtown Xenia was built in 1969. County leaders say the aging facility needs to be replaced with an updated and expanded facility. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Greene County voters face a choice in the March 17 primary. Should the county increase the sales tax to fund construction of a new and larger jail? A editorial on Greene County Issue 12 from a prior issue of the News.

  • EDITORIAL: Good news, bad news

    The news about local news has mostly been bad news. Already faced with declining readership, shrinking advertising and growing digital competition, the newspaper industry has been hit hard with a string of cynical corporate buyouts, takeovers and mergers.

  • EDITORIAL — ‘We are the weeds’

    There’s an irony in writing about invasive species that’s impossible to escape. Which species is more invasive than my own? [Editorial republished from the Nov. 7, 2019, issue of the News.]

  • EDITORIAL — A civic life for noncitizens

    Villagers voted on May 8, Primary Election Day. According to election officials, voting ebbed and flowed throughout the day at Antioch University Midwest, with an overall turnout of 1,664 voters. For precincts in Yellow Springs and Miami Township, the total turnout was about 53 percent, compared to 22 percent county-wide. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Yellow Springs has an opportunity to strengthen its stance as a welcoming community with our upcoming vote on a charter amendment that would give any Yellow Springs resident, citizen or noncitizen, the right to vote on municipal matters.

  • EDITORIAL — Contemplating farm to table

    The college’s first crew of four-legged lawnmowers in 2015, shown with Farm Manager Kat Christen and then-student and Farm Assistant Alli King. (YS News file photo)

    When good faith efforts to nudge our neighbors turns into relentless haranguing — or even harassing — it’s time to back off, take a breath, and re-assess. This is the case with regards to the latest challenge to the Antioch farm: a months-long campaign to not kill for food the lambs currently grazing under the solar panels.

  • EDITORIAL — Because of guns

    In shooting after shooting, there is one common denominator. Guns. [Editorial republished from the Aug. 8, 2019, issue of the News.]