Jul
05
2020
from-the-print Section

Yellow Springs lost an additional 7.3 percent of its population in the last decade, continuing a 40-year population plummet.

More from-the-print Articles
  • Racism in village often covert

    The YS Community Foundation Encore Miller Fellows helped support the Courageous Conservations series, organized by The 365 Project and the Yellow Springs Havurah to address issues of race. Here, one local group met earlier this year. From left is David Seitz, Vivian Markley, Kirk Weigand, Megan Bachman, Mori Rothman, Karen McKee, Moya Shea, Marianne MacQueen, Lauren Heaton (obscured), and Locksley Orr. Also participating in the group was Rich Bullock and Encore Miller Fellow Jalyn Roe, who co-facilitated with MacQueen. A new round of Courageous Conversations is starting up in the fall. Those interested in participating should contact Encore Miller Fellow Len Kramer at len2654@gmail.com, or 937-572-4840. (Submitted photo)

    Facing Race: This is first in a series on the impacts of racism in Yellow Springs and local anti-racist efforts and activities.

  • New police reforms aired

    Body cameras worn by every Ohio police officer. Psychological evaluations of those who hope to become an officer. More training in implicit bias and de-escalation. Requiring officers to report on another officer’s misconduct. Those are a few proposed law enforcement reforms Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced at a press briefing last week in response to national outrage after high-profile killings of Black people by police in recent weeks.

  • Prosecutor: evidence supports self defense in Grinnell Road double fatal shooting

    The Greene County Grand Jury’s recent conclusion concerning the double fatal shooting Feb 12 outside a home on Grinnell Road — which the county sheriff described at the time as a “shootout” — confirmed the initial impression of law enforcement at the scene that gray winter morning: self-defense.

  • Road rave

    While this year’s Pride scheduling was markedly different than year’s past, the fanfare and the spirit of the celebration were still in dazzling display.

  • Council declares racism ‘public health crisis’

    At its June 15 regular meeting, Village Council declared racism a public health crisis and committed to taking “meaningful action” to respond to the “death, trauma and injury caused by institutional racism.”

  • Antioch’s altered, but heartfelt, commencement

    Due to COVID-19, the sixth commencement of the relaunched college took place as an online ceremony rather than the customary in-person one, with live and recorded speeches streamed at 1 p.m. Recorded performances from the World House Choir were also part of the virtual festivities. Those who wish to watch the event can do so at antiochcollge.edu/commencement.

  • No charges in Grinnell shooting

    No charges will be filed in the double fatal shooting that occurred Feb. 12 outside a home on Grinnell Road, just south of Yellow Springs, the Greene County prosecutor has announced.

  • Schools prepare to reopen Aug. 27

    From left, Jack Hutchings, Maddox Fry, Era Creepingbear and Alayna Hamilton were among the Mills Lawn students who took part in Hour of Code last week, an international movement designed to introduce children of all ages to computer science and coding. Megan Bennett’s third-grade class was already ahead of the curve, having completed a project-based learning, or PBL, project called “Coding Cadets” this fall. The third graders took their coding knowledge to their older and younger peers, coaching each Mills Lawn class in the basics of creating with code. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    The current message from Ohio’s governor is that schools will reopen in the fall, but local districts will have a great deal of control over how that happens and what the return looks like, Yellow Springs Schools Superintendent Terri Holden told the local school board last week.

  • Creating wildlife habitat, villagewide

    In late summer, native sunflowers in Ellen Hoover’s garden draw goldfinches. The bright yellow birds feast on seeds, then burst out like sunflower petals flung to the sky. Down the street, monarch butterflies browse Catherine Zimmerman’s coneflowers, goldenrod and asters.

  • COVID-19 update— ‘Worrisome’ trend? More new cases

    New cases of COVID-19 are rising in Greene County, Gov. Mike DeWine said at his June 18 press briefing. He highlighted Greene County as one of five southwest Ohio counties that have seen case increases in June.