2021 Yellow Springs News Merchandise
Sep
16
2021

Articles About agriculture

  • Root causes

    Earlier this month, the Tecumseh Land Trust and Community Solutions hosted a garden tour of the bountiful and blooming gardens of the village.

  • On the history, future of Black farming

    According to the USDA’s latest census report, released in 2017, Greene County has no Black-owned farms, out of a total 617. Neither does Clark County, with 742 total farms; while Montgomery County charts nine Black-owned farming ventures, of 782 farms overall.

  • Local farmers eye uncertainty

    Life and growth are happening on local farms against the backdrop of massive shutdown and uncertainty due to the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Community Solutions conference— Hope in regenerative practices

    But messages of efficacy and hope, which can get lost in crisis turmoil, are at the heart of a three-day national conference Nov. 1–3 in Yellow Springs.
    “Pathways to Regeneration: Soil, Food, and Plant Medicine,” presented by the locally based Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions, will offer alternative ways of thinking and acting.

  • Scenes from the Greene County Fair — Rabbit costume contest

    Last Wednesday during the Greene County Fair was the 4-H-sponsored rabbit costume contest — in which youngsters and their pet rabbits dress in tandem, themed costumes.

  • 20th anniversary of Whitehall Farm auction— ‘Saving Whitehall’ legacy

    Whitehall Farm was permanently preserved. A local land trust was put on the map. And a community victory still inspires.

  • Seeds, not pesticides, fall from sky

    Local farmer Jim Clem will soon begin aerial seeding on his fields north of the village. Clem is spreading the word that the aircraft won’t be spraying pesticides but seeding cover crops to help enhance the soil. Here an aircraft seeds an area field. (Photo courtesy of Integrated AG Services)

    The small, low-flying aircraft that will soon buzz area farm fields are nothing to worry about, according to local farmer Jim Clem. At this time of year, the planes aren’t spraying pesticides but spreading seeds.

  • VIDEO — Local farmer to seed from the sky

    Local farmer Jim Clem is using aerial crop seeding to plant cover crops this fall. See a video featuring Clem on the new technique for increasing soil fertility.

  • Pitstick land purchased for agricultural use

    The 100 acres of farmland just north of the Center for Business and Education sold last month to the area farmers who had been farming it. While the local farm does not have a conservation easement on it, its use for agricultural purposes is likely to remain stable for now.