Mar
01
2015
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Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 6

  • Police chief search continues— Village still seeks applicants

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    Among the 18 candidates who have so far applied for the position of Yellow Springs police chief are three internal candidates, one former Village police chief and one finalist candidate from the previous chief search process.

  • Street work messy but promising

    Crew members of Village contractor Durst Brothers Excavation were tearing up the town this week to construct new sidewalks and plant new trees along the east side of Xenia Avenue. The current phase of the streetscape renovation is scheduled to be finished before Thanksgiving. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Although they were invasive and well past their expected lifespan, the eight Callery pear trees that were lifted from the downtown last week will be missed.

  • Miami Township Fire-Rescue honors 12 service members

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    Last Thursday evening Miami Township Fire-Rescue held a ceremony for newly trained fire fighters as well as new inductees to the squad.

  • Antioch University moves to Midwest

    Antioch University offices moved into the AU Midwest building this week. Pictured in front are the administrative staff of both institutions, from left, back row, chair of AUM’s Early Childhood Education program Julie Biddle, Enrollment Management Vice Chancellor Ronald Brown, Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs Director Sara Ross, VP of Institutional Advancement Ian Swedish, Library Director Steve Shaw, Marketing Manager Kelly Leff; and front row, School of Education Director Marian Glancy, AUM President Karen Schuster Webb, University Chancellor Felice Nudelman, core faculty member Mary Ann Short, Regional CFO Barbra Stewart, and presidential assistant Jennifer Maynard. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The hallways at Antioch University Midwest rumbled with the sounds of moving furniture, artwork and people this week as the 40 Antioch University administrators formerly located across the street moved into the Midwest building.

  • 18 apply for chief

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    When the Village stopped taking applications for the position of Yellow Springs police chief on Oct. 31, the municipality had 18 candidates from both inside the department and as far as Rhode Island, according to Village Manager Patti Bates, who will hire the next chief. So far, the hiring process is on schedule, and the Village is set to name the next chief in mid-December, Bates said this week.

  • Glen Helen welcomes volunteers to Honeysuckle Daze

    Glen volunteer Vincent Laino helped to clear invasive honeysuckle from the Glen over the summer.

    Among its various efforts to remove invasive species this year, the Glen invites volunteers to join its annual Honeysuckle Daze on Saturday, Nov. 15.

  • Forum on community policing— Safety over force is favored

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    There was remarkable similarity between what the 70 villagers who attended a local policing forum last week said and what 50 anonymous respondents said about policing in the weeks preceding the forum.

  • A peek at the mind’s universe

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    Popular scientist Michio Kaku likes to tell the story of how as a teenager in the 1960s, he built an atom smasher in his parents’ garage. He bought 22 miles of copper wire, wrapped it many times around a football field, connected it to 400 pounds of transformer steel and plugged it in. It blew out every fuse in his parents’ house and probably those of everyone in the neighborhood, he said in a recent PBS documentary science video.

  • Mills Lawn students do a sidewalk shuffle

    Mills Lawn music teacher JoFrannye Reichert led the  impromptu performance.

    Mills Lawn students sang and danced for the Little Art Theatre on Thursday during school.

  • Policing forum is tonight

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    Villagers have strong opinions about what they want their police force to be. According to recent anonymous input from Village Human Relations Commission surveys, many residents want police to be out of their patrol cars and visibly engaged with the community.