Dec
15
2017
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Friday
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Articles About Yellow Springs Dharma Center

  • Local death penalty opponents decry Ohio’s plans to resume executions

    State prison officials plan to put convicted killer Ronald Phillips to death Wednesday, July 26, more than three years after a controversial and apparently painful execution led to a moratorium on capital punishment in Ohio.

  • Eco-sattva: Climate compassion, action

    The Dharma Center and Community Solutions are partnering to offer an “eco-sattva” training beginning Jan. 12 to help villagers take mindful, effective action in response to climate change. Pictured outside the Dharma Center are, counterclockwise, course facilitators Saul Greenberg, Dione Greenberg and MJ Gentile, with Dharma Center Board Member Katie Egart. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Eco-sattva, a blend of “ecology” and “bodhisattva,” the term refers to a person working for the well-being of all life in the face of environmental harm.

  • Mindful environs

    The VIDA commission recognized the Dharma Center, located on the corner of Davis and Livermore streets, because the building and surrounding gardens “create a subtle yet compelling visual effect and atmosphere. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    The Yellow Springs Dharma Center is the spring 2016 recipient of VIDA, or the Village Inspiration and Design Award, which is awarded quarterly by the Yellow Springs Art and Culture Commission.

  • Tecumseh Land Trust and Dharma Center sponsor walking toward mindfulness

    Monthly nature meditation walks in Glen Helen are from 4–5 p.m. on the last Sunday of the month through October with the next session this Sunday, Aug. 25. The sessions include an introduction to meditation, 20-minute silent hike, thoughts on the season from Bill Felker, 20-minute journaliing period and group reflection. Organizers demonstrating walking meditation are, from front, Antioch College student Charlotte Pulitzer, Dharma Center board member Katie Egart, Tecumseh Land Trust executive director Krista Magaw and Felker. (Photo by Megan Bachman)c

    If you think the only way to meditate is sitting cross-legged with eyes closed, think again. A walking meditation in the great outdoors can open up a whole new world of sights, sounds, sensations and smells — all while re-wiring the brain to be more aware in everyday life.