Village Automotive — 052319_VillageAuto_728px_by_90px
Sep
17
2019
Yellow Springs
76°
broken clouds
humidity: 78%
wind: 7mph SSW
H 80 • L 76

Articles About African-American culture and history

  • Abecedary by Mills Lawn first-graders inaugurates Gaunt award

    A is For "AME Church"; from the book, "Wheeling Gaunt’s ABCs"

    For those who don’t know much about the life of Wheeling Gaunt, the Yellow Springs man who bought his own freedom from slavery and for whom Gaunt Park is named, there’s a handy resource out there — and it was written by Mills Lawn’s 2017–18 first-grade class.

  • Alyce Earl Jenkins— Recognized for service, teaching

    Alyce Earl Jenkins is shown in her Omar Circle home. She has been widely recognized for her work of rehabilitation counseling at Wright State University. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    “Sometimes when I’m feeling down, I come in here and think, well, I did make a contribution to different communities at different times,” Alyce Earl Jenkins said in an interview last week. That’s quite an understatement.

  • A people’s history of Yellow Springs

    About 50 and counting local residents, whose lives span three centuries, are represented in an ambitious effort to create a social history, a people’s history, of African Americans in Yellow Springs, organized by The 365 Project.

  • Hamilton honored as ‘Great Ohioan’

    Local children’s author Virginia Hamilton was given Great Ohioan Award by the Ohio Statehouse this week.

  • Virginia in Ohio

    Standing with Virginia Hamilton's Ohio Historical marker is Hamilton’s husband, Arnold Adoff; her son, Jaime Adoff; and granddaughter, Anaya Adoff. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A crowd of local students and community members converged on the Yellow Springs library last Wednesday, March 22, for the dedication of a historical marker for renowned author Virginia Hamilton, who grew up and lived most of her life in Yellow Springs.

  • Story in stitches

    Pictured above is quilt maker Maxine Thomas, left, with Faith Patterson's daughter, Karen Patterson. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    A special quilt in honor of Faith Patterson was unveiled at the Yellow Springs library on Feb. 22.

  • Stories of amazing African Americans

    Bishop Daniel Payne, founder of Wilberforce University, pictured here in a historical rendering, is among the notable African Americans featured in a local history talk at the YS Community Library on Feb. 23. (Photo via Library of Congress)

    Learn about notable African Americans from the Miami Valley in a local history talk at the YS Community Library this Tuesday, Feb. 23, 6–7:30 p.m. Presented by the National Afro-American Museum in Wilberforce.

  • Busting out

    Sculptor Brian Maughan watched as Gallery Coordinator Nancy Mellon unveiled his new work, a bust of Gaunt. The sculpture was added to the YS Arts Council’s permanent collection. (Submitted photo)

    The YS Arts Council and the YS Historical Society presented “Beyond Flour and Sugar: The Wheeling Gaunt Legacy and Yellow Springs In the Civil War Era” on Friday, Jan. 20, at Antioch University Midwest.

  • Building an historic collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture

    Smithsonian Institution. Tuliza Fleming, a YS High School graduate, is the curator of art for the Smithsonian’s recently opened National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Named to the position in 2007, she was tasked with creating the then yet-to-be-built museum’s permanent art collection. She’s shown here in 2014. (Submitted photo by Michael R. Barnes)

    The opening of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in September followed more than a century of efforts to recognize formally in our nation’s Capital the contributions of black Americans in the making, building, growth and life of this country.

  • A spotlight on local black history

    Antioch Professor of History Kevin McGruder, left, and Mills Lawn School Counselor John Gudgel, former principal of Yellow Springs High School, helped develop the new brochure, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” highlighting the rich history of African Americans in the village. Undertaken by the 365 Project, the brochure is available at the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Train Station and elsewhere in the village. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “If it weren’t for the role blacks have played in Yellow Springs, Yellow Springs wouldn’t be what it is today,” noted Yellow Springer John Gudgel recently.