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May
22
2018
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Articles About Yellow Springs Theater Company

  • YSTC’s theatrical ‘collage’

    The Yellow Springs Theater Company will present an original theater work written and directed by 2012 Yellow Springs graduate Colton Pitstick on Wednesday through Saturday, May 9–12, at First Presbyterian Church. Pictured, from left, are participants Keri Speck, Victoria Walters, Jennifer Johnson, Pitstick, Brian Upchurch, Ellen Ballerene and Carlos Landaburu. (Submitted photo)

    It started with a collection of poems. The writing was inspired by life; but the poems, composed over a span of about four years, are the basis of an original theatrical work debuting here next week when The Yellow Springs Theater Company presents “when heart beats…”

  • Original plays grace stage at 10-minute plays fest

    This year’s 10-Minute Play Festival features seven short plays, most of them written, directed, acted and produced by local residents. Pictured here, from left, Kevin Mulhall, Sam Butler, Jeremy Holtgrave and Ali Thomas recently rehearsed a military satire written by Holtgrave. Festival performances are Friday and Saturday, Jan. 26 and 27, at 8 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    This year’s 10-Minute Play Festival, produced by Yellow Springs Theater Company, are largely written, acted, directed and produced by local residents, making the festival a showcase of homegrown talent.

  • ‘Fefu’ fun and thought-provoking

    Amy Taint and Sommer McGuire rehearse a scene from the play “Fefu and Her Friends." (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    “Fefu and Her Friends” production opens this weekend at First Presbyterian Church with performances at 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, Sept. 28–30 and Oct. 5–7. Tickets are $10 at the door.

  • ‘Lend me your ears …’

    Shown above on Saturday night are, from left, Aaron Saari as Caesar; Carson Betts as Marc Antony; Elizabeth Lutz Warren as Calpurnia and Andrea Hansgen as Antony’s assistant. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” was performed outside and in the round last weekend on the grounds of Mills Lawn School, and the production continues this weekend at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, July 21 and 22.

  • Politics, music (and blood) in YSTC’s Caesar

    Aaron Saari (left), in the title role of Julius Caesar, and Jared Mola, as Brutus, rehearse the moment Caesar learns of his trusted comrade’s ultimate betrayal, in preparation for Yellow Springs Theater Company’s presentation of Shakespeare’s political tragedy, July 14–15 and 21–22, under the stars on the grounds behind Mills Lawn School. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    Inspired by the renowned Antioch Shakespeare festivals of the 1950s, the YSTC performances of ‘Julius Caesar’ will be presented Fridays and Saturdays, July 14–15 and 21–22, in the field behind Mills Lawn School, with live music starting at 7 p.m. and the play’s opening at 8.

  • ‘Adult’ side of children’s author, Shel Silverstein

    Members of the Yellow Springs Theater Company recently rehearsed for their upcoming production of “An Adult Evening of Shel Silverstein,” a collection of 10 short plays written by the renowned children’s author. The plays showcase Silverstein’s trademark offbeat humor, but take many more liberties with adult content, language and gallows humor. The production debuts this weekend. From left are Rob Campbell, Ellen Ballerene and J. Gary Thompson. (photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    Though it may come as a surprise to some, it’s not uncommon for children’s entertainers to have a rude alter ego.

  • Playtime

    The annual Ten Minute Play Festival features short plays by a number of local playwrights. Pictured are actors Ellen Ballerene, Lucas Mulhall, Ali Thomas, Dinah Anderson, Lorrie Sparrow-Knapp and Lucas Samson, rehearsing a piece about a group of cartographers. (Submitted photo by Miriam Eckenrode-Saari)

    The annual Ten Minute Play Festival happens this weekend, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Theater Company, or YSTC.

  • Yellow Springs takes part in nationwide reading— Play asks, Can it happen here?

    Yellow Springs is taking part in a nationwide staged reading of a new adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s political novel, “It Can’t Happen Here.” More than 40 venues will host readings of the play on Monday, Oct. 24, with our local reading scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Yellow Springs library. The Berkeley Repertory Theatre in California is organizing the nationwide event; Yellow Springs organizers are Ara Beal and Lorrie Sparrow-Knapp. (Image courtesy of the Berkeley Repertory Theatre)

    A prescient novel from 1935 is getting new life as a touchstone for our current presidential season.

  • YSTC production— ‘Wicked’ play comes our way

    From left to right, “sideshow freaks” Ben McKee, Victoria Walters, Brian Upchurch, Ali Thomas and Joshua Hayward loom around Ben Cronan, seated, who plays Mr. Cooger in Yellow Springs Theater Company’s production of Ray Bradbury’s “Something Wicked This Way Comes.” The play features a number of odd locations and weird characters, an appealing feature for the actors involved. Opening night is Friday, Oct. 14, at 8 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    The auditorium of First Presbyterian Church was echoing with strange howls and exclamations last week, as a klatch of “carnival freaks” formed a circle and wailed around two adolescent friends. It was a strange sight to behold.

  • The Bard, back under the stars at Antioch College

    Miriam Eckenrode Saari and Garrett Young danced to a sprightly fiddle tune (courtesy of the Corndrinkers, in background) during a rehearsal of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” last week. Performances are free, and will be held outside Antioch Hall (Main Building) on Fridays and Saturdays, July 15–16 and 22–23. Curtain is at 8 p.m. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Yellow Springs and Antioch College were once known around the world for a precedent-setting outdoor Shakespeare festival. This month, that tradition is being revived — in a small way, but with the hope of bigger things to come.

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