2021 Yellow Springs News Merchandise
Sep
18
2021

Articles About The 365 Project

  • 365 Project — Exploring Black ancestry at Glen Forest Cemetery

    On Saturday, July 24, people slowly trickled into Glen Forest cemetery, lingering near the cannon commemorating the service of veterans during the Civil War, including Black soldiers who are buried in the cemetery.

  • Reparations fund to address past injustice

    From left, Yellow Springs residents John and Maria Booth and Liz Porter were among the participants in Black Lives Matter protests at the Beavercreek Walmart in December 2014, following the police shooting death of John Crawford III in August. (News Archive photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Though the national conversation around reparations began again in earnest last year as Americans took to the streets in protest over the police killings of Black Americans, that conversation continues to stall over a series of sticking points: What should reparations look like? To whom should they be granted? And who should pay them?

  • Wrecking Racism— Staying informed, only to mourn

    “One may question the movement in the forward direction, one may try to understand the experience of another, but how will there be a mending of relationships when the disconnect seems so severe?”

  • Wrecking Racism— Youth voices needed now

    The purpose of the column will be to provide an avenue for youth of the village to express their ideas, observations, experiences and thoughts about racism, race relations and related topics both locally and nationally.

  • Banner up

    On Friday, Sept. 4, a new Black Lives Matter banner was raised across U.S. 68 on the north end of the village.

  • Gaunt rising

    The grand opening of the Wheeling Gaunt Community Room at the Yellow Springs Arts Council was marked by the completion of a mural created by local muralist and Yellow Springs native Maiya Celeste. (Photo by Kathleen Galarza)

    The grand opening of the Wheeling Gaunt Community Room at the Yellow Springs Arts Council was celebrated by a standing room-only crowd on Saturday, Aug. 17.

  • McKee Group program to focus on local black history

    The James A. McKee Association will host a community conversation on the history of African Americans in Yellow Springs this week.

  • Antioch College steps up diversity, inclusion

    The reality of a relatively robust percentage of students from diverse backgrounds living together on a small campus can make for a uniquely challenging college experience, according to Antioch leaders. And those leaders, including faculty, staff and students, are aiming to help students address those challenges.

  • Sidewalk slur evinces racism

    A newly poured concrete curb along West South College and Wright streets was defaced with a racial slur on Oct. 30 (left), and was smoothed over before it set completely (right) by a worker. (Photos Submitted by Kevin McGruder)

    Last month, a newly poured block of concrete was defaced with a racial slur at the corner of Wright Street and West South College Street.

  • Celebrate 10 years of The 365 Project

    The 365 Project celebrates 10 years of engaging the community on issues of race and preserving local black history with an event on Sunday.