Mar
19
2019
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Articles About Wright State University

  • Faculty strike looms at Wright State

    With the threat of a looming strike, about 200 Wright State University faculty members and their supporters packed the most recent meeting of the university’s board of trustees Friday morning, Oct. 19, to express their frustration and anger about the ongoing impasse in contract negotiations.

  • Wright State shuts down Fels study

    An unidentified Fels Longitudinal Study doctor is shown here circa the 1950s examining a young participant. The longest and largest longitudinal health study in the world, the Fels study, for many years based in Yellow Springs, still has more than 1,000 participants in the area, who had yearly appointments beginning in childhood to gather information on body composition. Last month Wright State closed down data collection for the Fels study, which would have turned 90 next year. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    The Fels Longitudinal Study, the world’s longest and largest longitudinal human growth study, has recently come to a close due to actions by Wright State University, which for decades has housed the study.

  • Four questions for poet Kaveh Akbar

    Acclaimed poet Kaveh Akbar is reading April 3 as part of Wright State University's Visiting Writers Series. (Photo by Paige Lewis, via the Poetry Foundation)

    Poet Kaveh Akbar is coming to Wright State University April 3, as part of its Visiting Writers Series. Here, the News asks Akbar four questions about his life in poetry.

  • School facilities update — K–12 options off the table

    The Yellow Springs school district is no longer considering building options that would put a combined K–12 facility on a single site, according to Superintendent Mario Basora this week. He cited cost as the reason for taking the K–12 options off the table.

  • Pens to Pictures— Films give voice to prisoners

    Five short films created through the Pens to Pictures project, by five women incarcerated at Dayton Correctional Institution, will be screened Thursday, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., at Little Art Theatre. Pictured are the filmmakers and their program partners, including DCI assistant to the warden Vivian Covington, seated, front row left, and project originator and coordinator Chinoye Chukwu, seated, front row right. (Submitted photo by William Jones)

    Addiction, poverty, sexual abuse. The themes that run through the five short films created by incarcerated women through the Pens to Pictures project are difficult topics.

  • Reflections on the final note

    Wright State Universtiy psychology professor and Yellow Springs resident Cheryl Meyer sat with the collection of suicide notes that formed the backbone of a recent study of suicide. With three colleagues, she published the results of her research in a book called “Explaining Suicide.” The unusually large collection of notes provided data that allowed researchers to pursue aspects of the phenomenon that hadn’t yet been studied. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    While suicide notes only exist because of the most sorrowful of circumstances, the epistles nonetheless provide significant insight into the psychology of committing the final act, and therefore what might be able to be done to prevent it.

  • Board approves sale— WSU land sale may advance fire station plans

    The Wright State University Board of Trustees voted last Friday to approve the potential sale to a qualified buyer of about four acres of land in Yellow Springs, the former site of the medical clinic on Xenia Avenue between Marshall and Herman streets.

  • Yellow Springs middle and high school student drug use assessed

    On Monday, Yellow Springs students filled out the latest version of the Dayton Area Drug Survey, a bi-annual survey designed to collect data on the substance use habits of area students.

  • Scientist finds new ash borer host

    Wright State University Biology Professor Dr. Don Cipollini pointed out his groundbreaking discovery that the white fringe tree can be a host for the emerald ash borer. Cipollini was the first to publish research and convince the U.S. EPA to confirm the white fringe tree as the only other known host for the invasive beetle. Trees planted along the bike path and elsewhere in the village were instrumental to his discovery. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A local white fringe tree planted along the bike path is now famous as the second documented host of an invasive beetle that was thought to only prey upon ash trees.

  • Wasp named for ‘lord of the flies’

    Entomologist John Stireman, who lives in the village and works at Wright State University, was honored in November by having a newly-identified wasp, the Ilatha Stiremani, named after him. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In the 1979 science fiction horror film Alien, a parasitic extraterrestrial bursts out of an astronaut’s chest, killing him, in the film’s iconic scene. The lifecycle of parasitic insects is not much different, according to Wright State entomologist and Yellow Springs resident John Stireman.