Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 75

  • Superintendent finalists visit

    Three school superintendent candidates will visit the village next week, and the community is invited to hear from them, ask questions and get involved in choosing at meetings, Mon.–Wed., April 5–7, from 5:40 to 7:15 p.m.

  • Knitters’ art shredded to bits

    Thinking it was overgrown grass gone wild, school groundskeeper Craggy Conman threw his John Deere into high gear over the weekend and sheared the front lawn at Mills Lawn School down to an inch high. Luckily, he was only halfway done when he realized he had just shredded the artwork of Javabrite girls Nancine Lemon and Corrie Barakinanigloo, who have spent the past six months under a tarp knitting each of the lawn’s nearly 83 million blades of grass by hand.

  • TLT, AACW join for roots fest

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    Every year the local blues fest reminds community members about the roots of contemporary popular music. If gospel can spawn the blues, jazz, reggae and rap, then what can the art of the local community tell us about our own history and roots? African American Cross-Cultural Works and the Tecumseh Land Trust aim to find out when they put on the first ever Roots Fest on Saturday, March 27, at Bryan Community Center. It will be an evening of performances in which villagers use the arts to connect to and share their own stories.

  • Village Council gives first approval to 2010 budget

    At their meeting on Monday, March 15, Village Council members approved 5–0 the first reading of the Village budget for 2010. After three budget workshops on Feb. 9 and 23 and March 6, Council agreed on a total budget of $13,553,490 for 2010, including $3,671,167 allocated for the general fund; $1,616,810 for the special revenues fund; $126,353 for the debt services fund; $520,500 for the capitol projects fund; and $7,618,660 for the enterprise funds.

  • Dog park slated for Ellis Park

    With a crowd of about 70 people gathered on Monday, March 15, to hear about the fate of the village’s first bark park, Village Council members approved 4–1 a resolution to support a dog park at Ellis Park. Council requested that the group pursuing the dog park should consult the Tree Committee, whose members have spent over 20 years cultivating a scenic park at the Ellis Park location.

  • Film shows role for prison art

    Local filmmaker Joanne Caputo interviewed her nephew, John Caputo, in the Pittsburgh barbershop he opened after he was released from the Graterford state penitentiary in Pennsylvania. Villagers are invited to attend a free screening of her 40-minute documentary “Cutting Loose” at the Little Art Theatre on Friday, March 19, at 5 p.m.

    As a filmmaker who has experienced some success and some challenges, Joanne Caputo has occasionally asked herself the question, “Am I an artist?” It’s perhaps a feeling she shares with her nephew, John Caputo, who is the focus of her latest documentary. As a prisoner for 11 years at the Graterford and Harrisburg penitentiaries in Pennsylvania, John Caputo would say that art in some ways saved him. But in making a life after his release, he wonders if he is truly an artist or simply an ex-con who makes art.

  • Kings Yard building for sale

    After nearly 30 years under the ownership of one Springfield family, the long building that houses most Kings Yard shops will be sold at auction at 4 p.m. on Friday, April 2, at the Bryan Community Center. The building houses 10 retail spaces, nine of which are currently occupied, and the sale includes an adjoining wooded property to the north behind the post office.

  • Diversity decline linked to fewer jobs

    If Yellow Springs has lost a significant number of jobs in the past 15 years, it follows that villagers have lost employment opportunities, which has a visible effect on an already minority African-American population. There are fewer African Americans employed in the village now than there were 30 years ago, and though there have never been a lot of African Americans who own and operate businesses in town, the current number appears to be lower than ever.

  • Village crew works snow days

    Village road and electric crew members, including from left, Kelley Fox, Jane Hamilton, Dave Conley, Jason Hamby, Jason Woods and Kent Harding, have spent the past two weeks plowing a total of around 20 inches of snow that fell on the village roads and parking lots.

    When the sky turns a steely grey and snow starts sheeting down, many residents run for their hearths and accept that they’re at the mercy of the white burial. But Village crew members head straight at the snow, outfitting themselves with plows and backhoes to wrangle up some order, at least in the streets. The eight members of the Village street and electric crews have done quite a bit of wrangling this month since the winter’s two biggest snowstorms dropped nearly 20 inches of snow on the village.

  • Virginia Hamilton book and award— Curating legacy of American writer

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    For many years after her death in 2002, the glass door to Virginia Hamilton’s writing office remained closed. Every day Arnold Adoff, her husband and writing partner, passed the office at their home in Yellow Springs, but he didn’t want to open it. Then in 2007 fellow children’s book writer Kacy Cook helped crack the vault, and out poured 35 years of research, notes, speeches and manuscripts that formed the gritty trail of an American intellectual and her life as mother, wife and prolific writer.