Oct
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2017
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Articles About Justice for John Crawford

  • A call for justice

    John Crawford III’s parents, John Crawford Jr. and Tressa Sherrod, pictured above, took part in the commemoration; Crawford Jr. delivered a powerful call for justice, and Sherrod released 25 balloons in honor of her son’s 25th birthday. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 150 people gathered outside the Beavercreek Walmart last Saturday, Aug. 5, to mark the third anniversary of the death of John Crawford III, who was shot by Beavercreek police inside the store in 2014.

  • Still seeking justice for Crawford

    John Crawford III

    In this final article of the series, “Justice for John Crawford,” the News will address the current status, two years after Crawford’s death, of remaining legal efforts around the case, the effect of the shooting on local activists, and reflections from Crawford’s father.

  • Ohio leaders scrutinize policing

    Sixth article in this series: In 2014, two high-profile police shooting deaths in Ohio occurred within three months of each other, sparking public outcry and calls for policing reform.

  • Guns and grand juries up for reform

    Walmart stores sell their guns behind glass, as pictured above. The Beavercreek Walmart, where John Crawford III was killed two years ago, previously sold air rifles off the shelf, but no longer sells the rifles, according to a store associate. The Xenia Walmart, however, continues to sell air rifles; a recent visit to that store counted 24 varieties of the rifle sold off the shelf. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Fifth article in this series: In Ohio, the public outcry following the police shootings of John Crawford III and Tamir Rice, as well as the growing national dialogue on policing and criminal justice, has led to a variety of recommendations for structural reform in the criminal justice system.

  • Racial factors in Crawford’s shooting

    People gathered last Saturday, July 30, at Courthouse Square in Dayton to protest the delay in the Department of Justice investigation of the police shooting death of John Crawford III, which took place Aug. 5, 2014. Shown above are, from left, Lynn Buffington and Don Nguyen of Beavercreek and Ndidi Achebe and Rachel Feltner of Dayton. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Fourth article in this series: Beginning in the early 2000s, Joshua Correll, a social psychology researcher now at the University of Colorado, began a series of studies examining the effect of race on shoot/don’t shoot decisions.

  • Through the lens of race: the 911 call

    A video still showing John Crawford III, at the far end of the aisle, and shopper Angela Williams and her two children in the foreground. The still is from a Walmart surveillance video from the night of Aug. 5, 2014. (From Walmart security cameras, Youtube)

    Third article in this series: From Beavercreek to Baton Rouge, high-profile police shootings of unarmed African-American men reveal dramatic disparities in how white and black citizens are perceived and treated by police.

  • Trip to Walmart ends in tragedy

    From left, Yellow Springs residents John and Maria Booth and Liz Porter were among the participants in Black Lives Matter protests at the Beavercreek Walmart in December 2014, following the police shooting death of John Crawford III in August. (News Archive photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Second article in this series: A detailed look at the events around the Crawford shooting.

  • Revisiting Crawford, two years on

    Yellow Springs residents played a large role in calling for justice after the 2014 police shooting of John Crawford III in a Beavercreek Walmart. Here, from left, villagers Joan Chappelle, Cheryl Smith and Bomani Moyenda were among area residents demonstrating at the Greene County courthouse in Xenia in December of 2014. Nearly two years after Crawford’s shooting, many questions remain. (News archive Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    First article in this series: The shooting of John Crawford and other young African-American men by police raised urgent questions about use of force, police relations with African-American communities and the role of race and racism in the justice system.