Land & Environmental Section :: Page 3

  • Easement to protect Glen for good

    With the support of a resounding 10 nonprofit, state and local government agencies, as well as $1.6 million in secured funding, the Glen has taken its first step into the protective fold of a permanent conservation easement.

  • Planners limit tiny homes

    In response to the question, “how small can a house be in Yellow Springs?” Village Planning Commission on Monday night chose to split the difference between those who favor and those who oppose allowing tiny houses in the village.

  • Pining for a resistant strain

    Yellow Springs Tree Committee members Anna Bellisari and Robert Gage enjoyed a rare view of Dayton Street and beyond from the height of a bucket truck last week. They went to the upper stories of an unusually strong and resilient Austrian pine to get clippings they will use to reproduce and potentially commercialize. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Village resident Robert Gage doesn’t relish heights, but even hovering at 70 feet in the air last week, he appeared less concerned with the drop than with the fertility of the newest shoots he was clipping.

  • New firm helps village go green

    New company GreenTech Energy Solutions will offer home energy audits, complete home retrofits and solar power products to local customers. Shannon Lindstrom, left, and alternative energy expert Chris Meyer, right, are partners in the new firm, along with Scott Lindstrom. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Interested in solar power? Adding insulation to your home? A super high-efficiency furnace? Then one local company, which is expanding services this month under a new name, may be the place to go for homeowners wanting to go green.

  • Glen seeks bird count volunteers

    downyguy

    Glen Helen leaders seek volunteers for their annual Greene County Christmas Bird Count, to take place Saturday, Dec. 29, from 8 am to 2 p.m.

  • Energy efficiency within reach

    Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy of Community Solutions are completing a new film, A Building Revolution: The Super-insulated Passive House, about ways builders and engineers around the world have developed to reduce home energy use by 80–90 percent. The film features local builders, such as Chris Glaser, above, working on a deep energy retrofit of the carriage house behind Community Solution in 2008. (Submitted photo)

    When Pat Murphy came to Yellow Springs in 2003, he said he could build a house that operated with 50 percent less fossil fuels than a conventional home, but his partner, Faith Morgan, didn’t believe him. Now, 10 years later, the couple is wrapping up a new film about homes built in Yellow Springs and around the country that use 90 percent less energy to heat and cool than conventional dwellings.

  • Let furniture rise from the ashes

    The coming decimation of the village’s ash tree population by an invasive Asian beetle — a kind of “Arborgeddon” for a tree that represents about one out of every 10 in our canopy — is a dismal story. Many beloved trees — on Mills Lawn, at the Antioch College campus, in the Glen — have already died. Others are showing signs of stress.

  • Doomed ashes find second life as furniture

    AshTree

    The coming decimation of the village’s ash tree population by an invasive Asian beetle is a dismal story, but the ashes could have a second life as furniture, cabinets, flooring and artwork.

  • Village buys Railroad Street lot

    Thirty-five people gathered around the gravel lot to witness the the auction of the property at the corner of Railroad and Dayton streets. After a short bidding process, the Village of Yellow Springs had purchased the property for $170,000.

  • Village buys downtown property at auction

    Live auction at Railroad and Dayton Streets on Thursday, Oct. 18.

    Village buys vacant lot at Railroad and Dayton Streets.

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