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Articles About Women's March on Washington

  • Women’s March co-founder Tamika Mallory— Struggle against racism continues

    Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women’s March, stands in front of a projected photograph of Coretta Scott King, Antioch alumna. Mallory gave a talk at Antioch College on April 26, the day after she received the second annual Coretta Scott King Legacy Award. She told the audience that the struggle for civil rights continues and that fighting systemic racism is everyone’s responsibility. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Evoking the words of the late Coretta Scott King, Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women’s March, in town to accept an award in the Antioch College graduate’s name, told an audience that fighting systemic racism is everyone’s obligation. 

  • Community unity powers D.C. Women’s March

    After riding through the night via chartered bus, and deposited in a Washington, D.C., parking lot after sunrise Saturday, Jan. 21, 55 women from Yellow Springs prepared to join hundreds of thousands of people from across the country streaming toward the National Mall for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. The bus passengers represented a portion of village residents who particpated in the historic event. (Submitted photo by Lydia, the busdriver)

    Local preparation for last weekend’s Women’s March on Washington may have been as significant for many Yellow Springs women, and for the community at large, as the actual march itself.

  • Monumental Women’s Marches in YS, D.C. and elsewhere

    At least 250 villagers took to the sidewalks in downtown Yellow Springs last Saturday, Jan. 21, marching in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and hundreds of other marches around the country and world. The local Sister March was organized by McKinney Middle School seventh-graders Carina Basora and Ava Schell, who set out to create a positive event for all ages in support of equality and women’s rights. Judging by the march’s impressive attendance and joyful vibe — and the abundance of young, determined marchers, including, from left, Oskar Dennis, Malaya Booth and Vivian Bryan — they succeeded. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    Photographs tell some of the story of the Women’s March on Washington, a show of solidarity, support for women’s rights and protest against the policies and stances of President Trump. Here, we’ve gathered images from Yellow Springs, Dayton, D.C. and elsewhere.

  • Big small steps

    An impressively attended Sister March to the Women's March on Washington, D.C. made its way through Yellow Springs Saturday, Jan. 21. Among the many young, determined marchers, from left, were Oskar Dennis, Malaya Booth and Vivian Bryan. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    At least 250 villagers took to the sidewalks in downtown Yellow Springs last Saturday, Jan. 21, marching in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and hundreds of other marches around the country and world.