Oct
15
2019
Yellow Springs
38°
clear sky
humidity: 100%
wind: 5mph E
H 43 • L 39

Articles About Agraria

  • Lending local farmers a hand

    Yellow Springs Farmers Market coordinator Michele Burns sold maple syrup at her stall at the weekly market earlier this season. More recently, her Flying Mouse Farms booth has also featured greens, beets, broccoli and cauliflower. Burns sees the farmers market as a key part of the local food system. (Photo by Luciana Lieff)

    Over the last few weeks, the News interviewed farmers who raise livestock and grow produce for the local market. They spoke to the joys and challenges of farming, both brought into sharper detail with this season’s stormy weather. This week, the News covers what local organizations are doing to grow the local food movement.

  • Heaving a ball at Agraria

    Two weeks ago, 36 educators from public schools in Yellow Springs, Xenia, Fairborn, Springfield, and Dayton attended a two-day workshop at Agraria to create lesson plans around concepts like soil, regenerative agriculture and ecological restoration. Here, the educators threw “seed balls” (Submitted photo)

    Two weeks ago, 36 educators from public schools in Yellow Springs, Xenia, Fairborn, Springfield, and Dayton attended a two-day workshop at Agraria.

  • Good green, bad green

    Not all green is “green.” That’s the message from local land managers who are combating a host of non-native invasive plant species that menace locally preserved and reclaimed lands. 

  • Growing local—Coming home to their cows

    Scott and Jillian Marshall are in their seventh year of raising beef cattle at their West Jackson Road farm a few miles northeast of the village. The local farmers — who still have their day jobs — love caring for the cows, teaching their children about the cycle of life and serving customers with antibiotic-free, mostly grass-fed beef. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Although agriculture is Ohio’s No. 1 industry, most of what is grown in the state is not consumed here.

  • New grants for Agraria —  Kids get the dirt on soil education

    Mills Lawn third-graders Emery Fodal and Wyatt Fagan counted soil invertebrates using Berlese Funnels at Agraria last spring. They also kept data on soil temperature levels over a four-week period at the farm. (Submitted photo by Peg Morgan)

    The architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller often used a metaphor to illustrate how small targeted actions can move massive systems. Fuller noted that the “trim tab,” a tiny mechanism of a ship’s rudder, can change the ship’s course with a minute movement. At the Agraria Center for Regenerative Agriculture, soil is seen as that “trim tab.”

  • Grounding vision of resilience at Agraria

    Community Solutions Executive Director Susan Jennings looked out at the Agraria farm from the renovated barn at the 128-acre property just west of the village. Community Solutions’ annual meeting will be at Agraria on Saturday, July 21, from 2 to 4 p.m. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    On the property Community Solutions purchased last year, the 75-year-old local nonprofit wants to model regenerative agriculture as part of its mission to create resilient communities in the face of climate change.

  • Celebrate spring at Agraria

    The Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions will host a Spring Equinox Celebration from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, the date for this year’s vernal equinox.